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Below is a simplifed DDL and DML to represent something I've been burning serious amounts of brain matter over. Long timer reader, first time poster and hopefully not breaking any SO etiquette or using too much ink in this post.

There are resources that can be turned on or off (permitted) for certain units within the business organization. I've taken a shortcut below and just defined the Sections table, but there would be a Companies and Divisions table as well.

I can set permissions for a resource using any combination of Company, Division and Section.

A permission set for a Section only would outrank a permission set for just a Division or a Company.

Setting a permission to Y with NULL for Company, Division and Section means that if there isn't a permission specific to that business unit, then they will get access to the resource based on this "default" value.

At the moment, I am finding the most relevant permission for a business unit by doing multiple SELECTs with the most specific WHERE clause first (looking for ResourcePermission with Company, Division and Section equal to that of the supplied business unit) to the least specific (NULL for all three). Eight SELECTs altogether.

If, later on, there are more business levels to be added (Department, UserGroup...), the SELECTs take on the breeding habits of rabbits.

Is there a better way to achieve this in SQL or is it better suited to carry this out in procedural code.

Running the final SELECT below will give you 9 permissions for resources. I just want the three that are most specific to the business unit specified.

CREATE TABLE Resources (
  ResourceID varchar(20) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED,
  ResourceName varchar(100) NOT NULL)
GO

CREATE TABLE ResourcePermissions (
  PermissionID int identity(1,1) PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED,
  ResourceID varchar(20) CONSTRAINT [FK_Resources] FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES Resources(ResourceID),
  Company varchar(10) NULL,
  Division varchar(10) NULL,
  Section varchar(20) NULL,
  Permitted char(1) NOT NULL)
GO

CREATE TABLE Sections (
  Company varchar(10) NOT NULL,
  Division varchar(10) NOT NULL,
  Section varchar(20) NOT NULL,
  SectionName varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT PK_Sections PRIMARY KEY (Company, Division, Section) )
GO

INSERT INTO Sections VALUES('Company 1','Division A','Red Section','Redskins')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 1','Division A','Blue Section','Bluejays')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 1','Division B','Red Section','Redskins')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 1','Division B','Blue Section','Bluejays')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 1','Division C','Red Section','Redskins')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 1','Division C','Blue Section','Bluejays')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES('Company 2','Division A','Red Section','Redskins')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 2','Division A','Blue Section','Bluejays')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 2','Division B','Red Section','Redskins')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 2','Division B','Blue Section','Bluejays')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 2','Division C','Red Section','Redskins')
INSERT INTO Sections VALUES ('Company 2','Division C','Blue Section','Bluejays')

INSERT INTO Resources VALUES('Irish','Irish Resource')
INSERT INTO Resources VALUES('English','English Resource')
INSERT INTO Resources VALUES('French','French Resource')

INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('Irish', NULL, NULL, NULL, 'Y')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('Irish', NULL, NULL, 'Blue Section', 'N')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('Irish', NULL, 'Division A', 'Blue Section', 'N')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('Irish', 'Company 1', 'Division A', NULL, 'N')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('French', NULL, 'Division B', 'Blue Section', 'Y')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('French', 'Company 2', NULL, 'Blue Section', 'N')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('French', 'Company 1', NULL, 'Blue Section', 'Y')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('French', NULL, NULL, 'Blue Section', 'Y')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('French', NULL, 'Division B', 'Red Section', 'N')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('French', NULL, 'Division C', 'Red Section', 'Y')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('English', NULL, 'Division B', 'Blue Section', 'Y')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('English', 'Company 2', NULL, 'Blue Section', 'N')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('English', NULL, 'Division A', 'Blue Section', 'N')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('English', NULL, NULL, 'Blue Section', 'N')
INSERT INTO ResourcePermissions VALUES('English', 'Company 1', 'Division A', 'Blue Section', 'Y')

Query:

  SELECT ResourceID, Company, Division, Section, Permitted
    FROM ResourcePermissions
   WHERE (Company = 'Company 1' OR Company IS NULL)
     AND (Division = 'Division A' OR Division IS NULL)
     AND (Section = 'Blue Section' OR Section IS NULL)
ORDER BY ResourceID
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What is your end goal? To see all resources and their permissions for a set of company, division and section? Or just the permissions for a specific resource across all comp/division/sections? –  Daniel Williams May 26 '11 at 0:10
    
I want to see all resources and their permissions for a set of company, division and section. But just one permission per resource - the permission that is the "best fit". –  Paul Logan May 26 '11 at 0:23
    
You need to provide a quantified, deterministic definition of "Best Fit". Ie., something like a formula or procedure that returns a number that represents the "goodness" of the fit where a higher number is a better fit. Right now, what you have provided is still ambiguous, and thus irresolvable. –  RBarryYoung May 26 '11 at 1:06
    
@RBarryYoung: I am pretty sure he means by "Best" at the smallest level of the corporate structure where the permission is not NULL. –  Andrew Lazarus May 26 '11 at 3:23
    
OK, I've used a very subjective term. I'll try quantify it a bit. In the final query, the English permission I want would be Y because of the ResourcePermission for Company1, Div A, Blue Section. The French permission would be Y because of the Company 1, NULL Division, Blue Section. And finally the Irish permission would be N because of the NULL Company, Div A, Blue Section permission. –  Paul Logan May 26 '11 at 7:40
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2 Answers

This can be done in one query if you use analytic queries, but I would personally use temporary tables and several queries.

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE _ResourceDetail AS
SELECT ResourceID
  , Company
  , Division
  , Section
  , Permitted
  , CASE WHEN Company IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END
    + CASE WHEN Division IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 2 END
    + CASE WHEN Section IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 4 END
    AS Priority
FROM ResourcePermissions
WHERE (Company = 'Company 1' OR Company IS NULL)
  AND (Division = 'Division A' OR Division IS NULL)
  AND (Section = 'Blue Section' OR Section IS NULL);

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE _BestResource AS
SELECT ResourceID, max(Priority) as MaxPriority
FROM _ResourceDetail
GROUP BY ResourceID;

SELECT d.ResourceID
  , d.Company
  , d.Division
  , d.Section
  , d.Permitted
FROM _ResourceDetail d
  JOIN _BestResource b
    ON d.ResourceID = b.ResourceID
      AND d.Priority = b.MaxPriority
ORDER BY d.ResourceID;

Alternately you can easily just put an ORDER BY on the first query, and trivially filter for the maximum priority in a loop. (Or even push the calculation of Priority out of the database.)

Going the other way you can learn about analytic queries, and can use the first query as an input to a second query that labels the permissions for a recourse according to highest priority first, that feeds into a third query that selects just the highest priority. That will push work to the database, but I tend to find that approach less readable.

Incidentally it is worth noting that if ResourcePermissions gets large, your query as it stands will not be a good candidate for taking advantage of indexes. The 8 query version might therefore run significantly faster.

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I don't think this is an easy problem to set up, but it is made harder by the very denormalized structure of the schema. I'm assuming that there is actually a hierarchical setup where each company has multiple divisions and each division has multiple sections. Then you should have three tables, Companies, Divisions, Sections, and the Sections table would have only an FK for its division. (Its company can be determined from that.)

However, Companies, Divisions, and Sections share (at least) two attributes in common. They have parents (except for the highest level), and they can appear in ResourcePermissions. So what we have here conceptually calls out for inheritance. Since support for inheritance in pretty weak in most RDBMS (some in Postgresql, I don't know about SQL Server), you'll have to do much of the setup yourself with triggers. At the inheritance root is a table [pseudo DDL]

CorporateElement
element_id SERIAL (PK, AutoIncrement, etc.)
parent int (FK references CorporateElement.id)
level int or enum (Division, Section, etc., but not as text,
                  as an enum or an FK into a list of these)

ResourcePermissions
resource_id int (FK references Resource.resource_id)
element_id int (FK references CorporateElement.element_id)

Your Section and so-on tables inherit their key from element_id but their text names and other data are local to their own tables. Next you need the WITH RECURSIVE capabilities of SQL Server. I'm going to leave the answer incomplete here (will edit later), because there are a few ways of going about that—whether to join before or after the RECURSIVE part—and I need to think them through.

[edit] OK, here's a sample query, but based on refactoring the schema. I haven't tested it, but it should give a list of all resources with permissions. Minor mods could add those with none at any level. And the structure is flexible with respect to adding more levels of corporate entity.

WITH RECURSIVE permissions_search(resource_id, element_id, parent, permission) AS
(
SELECT resource_id, element_id, parent, permission
FROM resources
JOIN resource_permissions 
ON resources.resource_id= resource_permissions.resource_id
JOIN corporate_elements
ON corporate_elements.elements_id=resource_permissions.elements_id
WHERE corporate_element.level=section /* enum or magic int value */
UNION ALL
SELECT 
resource_id, element_id, permission
FROM permissions_search ps
JOIN resource_permissions 
ON resources.resource_id= resource_permissions.resource_id
JOIN corporate_elements
ON corporate_elements.elements_id=resource_permissions.elements_id
WHERE (corporate_elements.elements_id=ps.parent) AND (ps.permission IS NULL)
)
SELECT * FROM permissions_search WHERE permission IS NOT NULL;
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