Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

When I try to put 5 inline-block divs of 20% width with 1px borders, inside a containing div, also with a 1px border, they wrap on to the next line.

They do fit if I get rid of all the borders.

I understand that this is because the divs take up 100% of the containing divs area, including its padding and border area, meaning that they don't fit within the borders, so it has to wrap.

My question is how to modify this so that I can make them fit exactly. Surely this is a common problem?

<html>
    <head>
        <title> Test </title>
        <style type=text/css>

            div
            {
                margin: 0;
                padding: 0;
            }
            #navBar
            {
                border: 1px solid black;
                margin-left: auto;
                margin-right: auto;
                margin-top: 10px;
                width: 50%;
            }
            .navBtn
            {
                border: 1px solid black;
                display: inline-block;
                text-align: center;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="navBar">
            <div class="navBtn" style="width:20%">Text</div><div class="navBtn" style="width:20%">Text</div><div class="navBtn" style="width:20%">Text</div><div class="navBtn" style="width:20%">Text</div><div class="navBtn" style="width:20%">Text</div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

As a side note, it's crazy that if I put the 5 divs on their own lines, they get rendered with space between them, hence why they're all on one line. In my real code the divs are generated with php, so it's not long.

share|improve this question
    
not sure why this was tagged with php. – dqhendricks May 26 '11 at 1:14
    
OP sez "In my real code the divs are generated with php" (although this is a CSS question). – Steve May 26 '11 at 1:21
    
Yeah I guess the php part was not really relevant to my actual question. – Cam Jackson May 26 '11 at 1:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

margin:0 -1px 0 -1px gives you an easy place to start.

Would also recommend using float:left for this since display:inline-block is buggy in some browsers.

To get your container <div> to expand vertically to fit content, just have an element with clear:both after your floated ones.

All can be seen here: http://jsfiddle.net/steve/qEJaA/

share|improve this answer
    
That works, thanks! – Cam Jackson May 26 '11 at 1:32
    
No problem. Thank you too and welcome to SO. – Steve May 26 '11 at 1:39

One idea is to get rid of the 1px border for your .navBtn class, and create a nested element in each navBtn div:

<html>
    <head>
        <title> Test </title>
        <style type=text/css>

            div
            {
                margin: 0;
                padding: 0;
            }
            #navBar
            {
                border-top: 1px solid black;
                margin-left: auto;
                margin-right: auto;
                margin-top: 10px;
                width: 50%;
            }
            .navBtn
            {
                display: inline-block;
                text-align: center;
            }
.nav-text { border:1px solid #ccc; }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="navBar">
            <div class="navBtn" style="width:20%"><div class="nav-text">Text</div></div><div class="navBtn" style="width:20%"><div class="nav-text">Text</div></div><div class="navBtn" style="width:20%"><div class="nav-text">Text</div></div><div class="navBtn" style="width:20%"><div class="nav-text">Text</div></div><div class="navBtn" style="width:20%"><div class="nav-text">Text</div></div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Clever. Does it work? – dkamins May 26 '11 at 1:17
    
It does, at least on the browsers that I tested it out with. My preference is usually to add some additional HTML markup if it seems to simplify CSS rules (within reason) over CSS approaches because I'm not a CSS guru – Shan Plourde May 26 '11 at 1:45

Yes, this is a common problem.

There are (at least) two common solutions.


The first is have a wrapper element for each child element, and move the width to that. The border stays on the child element.

Because your id is navBar, this is obviously for some kind of menu, so I'm going to restructure your code to add the described wrapper elements, and to make it more semantic.

See: http://jsfiddle.net/wFeYn/

<ul id="navBar">
    <li style="width:20%"><a href="#">Text</a></li><li style="width:20%"><a href="#">Text</a></li><li style="width:20%"><a href="#">Text</a></li><li style="width:20%"><a href="#">Text</a></li><li style="width:20%"><a href="#">Text</a></li>
</ul>

#navBar {
    border: 1px solid black;
    margin: 10px auto 0 auto;
    width: 50%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0
}
#navBar li {
    display: inline-block;
    text-align: center;
}
#navBar li a {
    display: block;
    border: 1px solid black;
}

The second solution is to use CSS3's box-sizing: border-box.

This is very easy, and all modern browsers support it (unfortunately IE7 does not).

To use this with your original code you would do:

.navBtn
{
    border: 1px solid black;
    display: inline-block;
    text-align: center;

    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
}

If you do care about IE7, then you should know that display: inline-block won't work without some simple hacks.

For IE7 support, replace display: inline-block; with:

display: inline-block;
*display: inline;
zoom: 1;

That goes for either your original code, or my updated code. But only if you care about IE7.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, that works too! Is there any reason you used ul and li, specifically? – Cam Jackson May 26 '11 at 1:35
    
There are a couple of reasons. Firstly, what you have is a list of links. So the best choice element is ul (unordered list). And secondly, it eloquently solves the problem of adding an extra wrapper element. (assuming that these will eventually be links) Which looks nicer? <div id="navBar"><div class="navBtn" style="width:20%"><div class="nav-text"><a href="#">Text</a></div></div> .. </div> or <ul id="navBar"><li style="width:20%"><a href="#">Text</a></li> .. </ul> – thirtydot May 26 '11 at 1:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.