Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I reconstruct x,y,z from disparity using triangulation formula .My problem is that x,y, and z values are in very different orders .For eg order of x is like 0.001 and similar for y but z is in the order of 10 .Because of this I see a straight line instead of seeing a face .Is there any way I could apply some transform preserving the structure of face but getting a better reconstruction.

EDITED: here is a sample L image and the disparity map ( normalized to 0-255 for visualization not the true values).My point of giving this is to show that disparity comes out fairly decently. OriginalLeftImage

DisparityImage

share|improve this question
3  
Besides dividing the Z values by 10? I think you'd have to explain to us why the data look the way they do. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill May 26 '11 at 1:38
1  
I have no answer, but I found some more context for the question here: cs.washington.edu/homes/indria/project/CSE576finalproject/… –  e.James May 26 '11 at 1:41
    
@Ernest :-I am not sure what the reason is .It could be that to get L and R images we crop portions of bigger L and R images.Apart from that I am not sure why tht happens .For x and y though we use u and v where u = X- middleColumn.Isnt dividing by 10 going to squash the depth? Here are formulas I use : ptgrey.com/support/kb/index.asp?a=4&q=63 –  Manish May 26 '11 at 2:07
    
@e.James:-Thanks.. thats the page I referenced for getting the formula too. –  Manish May 26 '11 at 2:08
    
@Manish: From the disparity map you posted, it looks like the 3D reconstruction should be pretty simple. Isn't it equivalent to a simple elevation map at this point? Perhaps I am missing something. –  e.James May 26 '11 at 2:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming that you are solving for the fundamental matrix using point correspondences between the left and right images, this is the expected result. Because the fundamental matrix is rank-deficient, it is only defined up to a scale factor. If you define everything in terms of pixel units, there is no way to reconstruct the scene in real-world units.

Solving this requires an additional piece of information: the relationship between a pair of corresponding points in a three-dimensional coordinate frame. For a stereo system, this is most often the baseline, the distance between the left and right camera centers.

share|improve this answer
    
@Michael : i do not use anything related to fundamental matrix(atleast not knowingly) .For finding disparity I use OpenCV's matching function.For depth recovery I use z= Focal length*Baseline/Disparity .Here focal length is in pixels (coz I use the matlab tutorial and that says answer is in pixels).Disparity is in pixels and Baseline I enter is in metres so Z is effectively in metres then. –  Manish May 26 '11 at 5:01
    
@Manish: If you're already multiplying by the baseline, then this is not the problem. Most likely this is related to your initial guess: processing a small region of interest in a larger image. Are you calibrating the camera using the full resolution image or only the region of interest? –  Michael Koval May 26 '11 at 17:53
    
@Michael Koval:- Till now I calibrated the camera using the whole image but only used a part of it as L and R images.I think this might be causing the error .Is this what you are pointing too? –  Manish May 26 '11 at 18:52
    
@Manish: That might be the problem. If you are using OpenCV's camera calibration functions, you will need to modify the intrinsic matrix to adjust for the position of the ROI. The focal length (f_x and f_y) should be the same, but the image center (c_x and c_y) need to be shifted. –  Michael Koval May 26 '11 at 20:23
    
@Michael Koval : I do not use opencv's calibration function .I do the calibration in matlab using this (vision.caltech.edu/bouguetj/calib_doc) which gives me the focal length and baseline which is really all I need to get the z . –  Manish May 26 '11 at 21:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.