Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to apply a Class' style to only ONE level of td tags?

<style>.MyClass td {border: solid 1px red;}</style>

<table class="MyClass">
  <tr>
    <td>
      THIS SHOULD HAVE RED BORDERS
    </td>
    <td>
      THIS SHOULD HAVE RED BORDERS
      <table><tr><td>THIS SHOULD NOT HAVE ANY</td></tr></table>
    </td>
  </tr>
</table>
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 109 down vote accepted

Is there a way to apply a Class' style to only ONE level of td tags?

Yes*:

.MyClass>tbody>tr>td { border: solid 1px red; }

But! The ‘>’ direct-child selector does not work in IE6. If you need to support that browser (which you probably do, alas), all you can do is select the inner element separately and un-set the style:

.MyClass td { border: solid 1px red; }
.MyClass td td { border: none; }


*Note that the first example references a tbody element not found in your HTML. It should have been in your HTML, but browsers are generally ok with leaving it out... they just add it in behind the scenes.

share|improve this answer
    
Your first snippet (using the child selector) doesn't appear to work in Firefox 3.0.1. I get a red border around the 'THIS SHOULD NOT HAVE ANY' part. –  Nick Presta Mar 5 '09 at 1:49
    
This doesn't work in Chrome either –  bstoney Mar 5 '09 at 1:49
1  
your second example is correct, but your first example would put borders on everything. ".MyClass > tr > td" would probably work (in good browsers) –  nickf Mar 5 '09 at 1:50
    
oop. My fingers done gone wrong. ;-) thanks for the catch, fixed –  bobince Mar 5 '09 at 1:51
    
Your first snippet doesn't apply any red border in any 'good' browser (Fx 3.0.1, Chrome). –  Nick Presta Mar 5 '09 at 1:55

how about using the CSS :first-child pseudo-class:

.MyClass td:first-child { border: solid 1px red; }
share|improve this answer
7  
That won't work. This selects all td children in the children tree of .MyClass which are first of their containing element, and thus will also style the inner td. –  Lazlo Nov 12 '12 at 15:05

This style:

table tr td { border: 1px solid red; }
td table tr td { border: none; }

gives me:

this

However, using a class is probably the right approach here.

share|improve this answer
    
Using a class on every single td element may be a little redundant, you'd probably use a class on the containing table element, and then you'd still have to exclude second levels of tables - ie your first example is correct. –  thomasrutter Mar 5 '09 at 4:26

Just make a selector for tables inside a MyClass.

.MyClass td {border: solid 1px red;}
.MyClass table td {border: none}

(To generically apply to all inner tables, you could also do table table td.)

share|improve this answer

I wanted to set the width of the first column of the table, and I found this worked (in FF7) - the first column is 50px wide:

#MyTable>thead>tr>th:first-child { width:50px;}

where my markup was

<table id="MyTable">
 <thead>
  <tr>
   <th scope="col">Col1</th>
   <th scope="col">Col2</th>
  </tr>
 </thead>
 <tbody>
   ...
 </tbody>
</table>
share|improve this answer

I guess you could try

table tr td { color: red; }
table tr td table tr td { color: black; }

Or

body table tr td { color: red; }

where 'body' is a selector for your table's parent

But classes are most likely the right way to go here.

share|improve this answer

I think, It will work.

.Myclass tr td:first-child{ }

 or 

.Myclass td:first-child { }
share|improve this answer
    
Does the first one select the first td of every row and the second one only select the first td of the page? –  Josh Pinter Jul 31 at 18:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.