Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to Maven and am setting up my first maven project. I am also creating some maven assets in the form of some poms that can be inherited from or used as dependencies in any future projects as well. I want to group dependencies together and to be able to selectively add them to a project as needed.

I read this article on pom best practices. I like the idea of grouping related dependencies together into poms and then adding the pom as a dependency to a project as needed. This approach works great for compile scoped dependencies. However it fails for provided scoped ones since as transitive dependencies, they get omitted.

Here's an example of what I mean: Lets say I group together web dependencies for my projects into a web-deps pom.xml. These include compile scoped spring framework dependencies and also a provided scoped javaee one:

<modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
<groupId>com.xyz</groupId>
<artifactId>mvn-web-deps</artifactId>
<version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
<packaging>pom</packaging>

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-web</artifactId>
        <version>${org.springframework.version}</version>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-webmvc</artifactId>
        <version>${org.springframework.version}</version>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>javaee</groupId>
        <artifactId>javaee-api</artifactId>
        <version>${javaee.version}</version>
        <scope>provided</scope>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>

I then add this pom as a dependency in another project:

<modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
<groupId>com.xyz</groupId>
<artifactId>project-a</artifactId>
<version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.xyz</groupId>
    <artifactId>mvn-web-deps</artifactId>
    <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <type>pom</type>
</dependency>

The dependencies in mvn-web-deps now become transitive. Since the dependency reference above is compile scoped, the provided transitive dependency gets omitted.

I want to avoid adding them to the dependency section of a parent since there can only be one parent and a project may need only some of these dependency groups, not all. I can perhaps add them to the dependencyManagement section, but then I will have to redeclare each dependency (sans the version) in each child project.

What is the correct/better way of grouping dependencies while avoiding the issues like above?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

I concluded that Maven was not designed for this kind of use-case. I ended up having a parent pom.xml with all the libraries I use added to its <dependencyManagement> section. Any new projects/modules that I create have their pom.xml inherit from the parent pom.xml and add each dependency they need to their own <dependencies> section, minus the version. This scheme allows me to manage the versions for the libraries that I use and the respository declarations they need at a single place. Another advantage (over trying to create dependency bundles somehow) is that this gives more fine-grained control over the libraries added to child poms - only the dependencies that are actually needed are added.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The short answer to your question is that you should only include 'provided' dependencies locally where the code requires it to compile, but not in parent pom.xml or other structures. Indicating that you have a 'provided' dependency in global pom.xml is non-sense for maven, because it does not need it to compile in such pom.xml.

Here is the long answer:

When I started using Maven, I had the same idea of trying to group artifacts and dependencies into pom.xml modules hoping they would be useful in the future. Now, that I have a bit more experience, I got to understand that it is a complete waste of time. For me, this was form of over-engineering.

I have learned to split my big projects into separate modules, each in their own subversion repository. I am including dependencies as necessary for each local module in their pom.xml. I release versioned tags of each module as I am coding and as necessary (i.e., when tested and stable).

I build my big projects by creating a separate maven project with its own pom.xml and import my modules as dependencies. From time to time, I update the module's version in the dependency when I have made a release. Then, I let maven do the job of pulling whatever it has to pull, transitively of not, when compiling/releasing the big project.

Maven allows all sorts of complex constructions and hierarchy between pom.xmls, but IMHO this feature creates unnecessary mess and complexities. So far it has not proved to be a real benefit for me. At the beginning, I was hoping that compiling one pom.xml would compile the rest properly in a cascading way. I did get some result, but what a mess to maintain in all the global pom.xml.

Releasing my module's artifacts separately and building my project on these releases has saved me so much time that I can only recommend it. In total, I have less pom.xml to maintain and they are also less complex. For the same final result...

So, if your only reason for building global/structural pom.xml is a hope to save time, I recommend abandoning this idea... Separate code in separate projects, release and THEN compile globally.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. Perhaps I did not make my motivation to use such grouped dependencies very clear. I break my projects down into modules too. What I want to achieve from grouping related dependencies together is the ability to manage them at a single place and reuse them across projects by simple reference. contd.. –  Samit G. May 27 '11 at 0:13
    
I have a more or less fixed set of technologies which I use for developing web projects, for example, at my organization. So all web projects have at least some common set of dependencies which would be a must. I want to maintain those at a single place so that the knowledge of the repository, group id, artifact id and version numbers is localized and every developer starting a new web project doesn't have to worry about them and can just reference these dependencies somehow. –  Samit G. May 27 '11 at 0:14
add comment

Provided-scope dependencies are indeed inherited from parent POM, but NOT from POM defined as dependencies and I consider that a Maven weakness.

Given that Maven has also difficulties in adding modules as dependencies across module hierarchies, I can't say Maven is a sophisticated tool to manage multi-module projects. Maven expects a strict single-rooted hierarchy that is only suitable for the simplest projects.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.