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In C++, it's possible to say:

for (int i = 0; i < 100 && !found; i++) {
  if (items[i] == "the one I'm looking for")
    found = true;
}

so you don't need to use the "break" statement.

In Python, I guess you need to write:

found = False

for item in items:
    if item == "the one I'm looking for"
        found = True
        break

I know that I can write a generator which has the same code in it so I can hide this break thing. But I wonder if there is any other way to implement the same thing (with the same performance) without using extra variables or while loop.

I know we can say:

found = "the one I'm looking for" in items

I'm just trying to learn if it's possible to use multiple conditions in for loops.

Thanks.

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2  
Yes, it's posible to say what you just said in C++, but I guarantee you that it doesn't do what you intended—the comma operator evaluate its left-hand argument (which has no side effects here) and then evaluates its right-hand argument and results in that value. –  Adam Rosenfield May 26 '11 at 4:41
3  
The C++ should really be: for (int i = 0; i < 100 && !found; ++i) –  Richard Schneider May 26 '11 at 4:42
    
This depends on what you want to happen if the item isn't found. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 26 '11 at 4:43
    
@Richard Yeah, thanks :) I fixed it! –  pocoa May 26 '11 at 4:43
1  
@Matthieu I know, it is just an example to compare the for loops in Python and C++. It's not about finding an item into a loop, it could be something much more complicated. So, finding an item into a list is not the case. –  pocoa May 26 '11 at 15:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
>>> from itertools import dropwhile
>>> try:
...     item = next(dropwhile(lambda x: x!="the one I'm looking for", items))
...     found = True
... except:
...     found = False

Of course you can also write this without the lambda function as

>>> from itertools import dropwhile
>>> try:
...     item = next(dropwhile("the one I'm looking for".__ne__, items))
...     found = True
... except:
...     found = False

Now it looks to me that it is the C version using extra variables

If you really just need the found variable set (and don't need to know the item), then simply use

found = any(item=="the one I'm looking for" for item in items)
share|improve this answer
    
Ahah, yeah exactly. –  pocoa May 26 '11 at 5:08
    
Ah! The latter is really neat. –  Matthieu M. May 26 '11 at 6:40
    
+1 for any function. –  riza May 26 '11 at 8:10
    
@gnibber I could learn something new from your post, so I'll accept your answer. Thank you. –  pocoa May 26 '11 at 15:35

Since for loops in Python iterate over a sequence rather than a condition and a mutation statement, the break is necessary to bail out early. In other words, for in python isn't a conditional loop. The Python equivalent to C++'s for would be a while loop.

i=0
found=False
while i < 100 and !found:
    if items[i] == "the one I'm looking for":
        found=True
    i += 1

Even in C++, for loops can be rewritten as while loops if they don't contain a continue statement.

{
    int i = 0;
    while (i < 100 && !found) {
        if (items[i] == "the one I'm looking for")
            found = true;
        i++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, somebody should write a PEP for this feature :) –  pocoa May 26 '11 at 4:47
    
for in Python is like foreach in c# and is completely different than the for in C, C++ or Java. –  Richard Schneider May 26 '11 at 4:48
    
@Richard Yeah, but would be nice to have that feature. –  pocoa May 26 '11 at 4:50
1  
@pocoa: a PEP for a C-like for would likely get voted down as being unpythonic. –  outis May 26 '11 at 5:05
1  
@pocoa: Lennart may be being unkind to your idea, but he isn't trying to criticize you. You are certainly making sense, in that we understand you. If you meet an idea on the road, kill it. –  outis May 26 '11 at 20:31

if isn't the only statement to get an else clause in Python:

for item in items:
  if item == "the one I'm looking for":
    break
else:
  print "Item not found! Run away! Run away!"
  return
do_something_with(item)

while and try also have else clauses.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but that's not my question :) –  pocoa May 26 '11 at 4:48
    
Wrong indentation, which is error in Python. :D –  Nawaz May 26 '11 at 4:49
2  
@Nawaz: The indentation is absolutely correct. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 26 '11 at 4:49
2  
@pocoa, Your question asks about how to translate C idioms into Python. The point here is that in real Python the likes of the found variable are not needed so often because the looping constructs are similar but different to C (and other languages). The differences are important to learn about unless you are happy to churn out crappy Python code –  gnibbler May 26 '11 at 4:54
1  
@pocoa: The simple answer is "no". The more complex answer is "you don't need to". –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 26 '11 at 4:57

something like this?

def search(match, items):
    for item in items:
        if item == match:
            return True
    return False

EDIT:

def search(match, test, items):
    for item in items:
        if item == match and test(item) and the_sky_is_not_falling:
            return True
    return False
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, but that's not what I'm asking for. I'm just trying to understand if Python supports multiple conditions in for loops. –  pocoa May 26 '11 at 4:50
4  
Python doesn't support conditions in for at all. for doesn't handle conditions. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 26 '11 at 4:51
    
@Ignacio Thanks. –  pocoa May 26 '11 at 5:10

Yes you can!

>>> found = False
>>> for x in (x for x in range(10) if not found):
...    print x
...    if x == 5:
...       print "Found!"
...       found = True
... 
0
1
2
3
4
5
Found!

But it's daft, as you continue the loop even after x is found, so don't do it. :-)

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