Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code:

ObjectOutputStream oo = new ObjectOutputStream(new FileOutputStream("test.dat"));
ArrayList<String> list = null;
for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    list = new ArrayList<String>();
    list.add("Object" + i);
    oo.writeObject(list);
}
oo.close();

When I open the test.dat file and unserialize the objects, I get all the objects. But if I change my code to this:

ObjectOutputStream oo = new ObjectOutputStream(new FileOutputStream("test.dat"));
ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    list.clear(); //clear the earlier objects
    list.add("Object" + i);
    oo.writeObject(list);
}
oo.close();

Now when I read the objects, I only get the first one i.e. Object0. Can anyone please explain the behavior?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you write an object to an ObjectOutputStream twice, then the second time will just be written as a reference to the original data ("that ArrayList with id x that I wrote before").

This happens even if the content of the object has changed (as it does in your case), therefore you will only have 1 full serialization (the first one) and 9 references to that in the second case.

You could call ObjectOutputStream.reset() to discard the list of previously written objects and force it to do a full serialization again.

share|improve this answer
1  
Great post! I didn't know that before. Thanks for improving my knowledge of serialization. –  BertNase May 26 '11 at 5:59
    
Awesome thanks! –  Swaranga Sarma May 26 '11 at 6:32
add comment

It's because in one case, you are using 10 object instances and in the other, you are using 1 instance. Your oo is only knowing 1 instance of the object to persist.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.