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I have a wrapper with border radius. Inside the wrapper I have a absolute positioned image in the top right corner. My problem is that the image doesn't crop/hide under the wrapper with border radius. I've tried overflow:hidden on the wrapper but it doesn't work. See image below.

enter image description here

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Image tag is not affected by border-radius.

Your best bet is to use the picture as a background like:

<div id="someimage" style="background:url('image.jpg');border-radius: 5px; height: 200px; width: 500px;"></div>

The element(in above example a div) should contain the size of the actual image), and unless you use CSS3, the image cannot be resized like <img> tag

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this is likely to be the problem, although in fact it is browser-dependant: some browsers do crop foreground images, others don't. – Spudley May 26 '11 at 9:53
    
@Spudley: I think the problem is that curved borders impinge upon the inside of the content box whereas non-curved borders stay completely outside the content box so this problem doesn't arise for them. The content box (and hence the clipping) is still rectangular even when the border is not. Does that make sense or is my thinking confused by fatigue? – mu is too short May 26 '11 at 10:06
    
@mu is too short, I dont know about Spudley, but I am confused. :P – Starx May 26 '11 at 13:43
    
AFAIK, the contents gets drawn inside the content box and the border goes around the content box. A curved corner has to eat into the content box (which is rectangular) a little bit; then, the content which is drawn on top will overwrite the inner part of the curved corner. – mu is too short May 27 '11 at 5:10
    
@Spudley, which browser would that be? – Starx May 29 '11 at 5:57

You could use a separate absolutely positioned <div> for the border so that you can place the border above your absolutely positioned image. For example:

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="inner">
        <img id="i" width="75" height="75" src="http://placekitten.com/75/75">
    </div>
    <div id="border"></div>
</div>

And some CSS (WebKit border radius properties only, the rest are left as an exercise for the reader):

#wrapper {
    position: relative;
}

#inner {
    margin: 2px; /* Make room for the border */
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    position: relative;
}

#border {
    -webkit-border-radius: 5px;
    border: 2px solid black;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
}

#i {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    right: 0;
}

And the usual example: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/6e622/

The <div id="border"> is certainly a hack (and I feel a bit dirty for coming up with it) but maybe it will work for you.

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