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Hi guys I have the following.

class a extends Thread    
{
    public synchronized BigInteger getUniqueID()
    {
        BigInteger aUniqueID = new BigInteger(getUniqueKeyFromDatabase);
        return aUniqueID;
    }   
}

class b extends a
{
    public run()
    {
        BigInteger uniquieID = getUniqueID();       
        // store UniqueID in another database table with other stuff
     }
}

And what I'm getting is duplicate unique id stored in the database table. I'm assuming because uniqieID is being changed in this multi threaded environment.

I'm obviously going horribly horribly wrong somewhere, I'm guessing I shouldn't be returning the value in this way. Or should be defining uniqueID as new BigInteger based on the response from the getUniqueID method.

Any help would be greatly appreciated, as my fragile mind has been warped right now!

Cheers

Alan

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when you say "I'm getting is the wrong unique id stored somewhere", do you mean that you've duplicates? In which way is "wrong"? –  stivlo May 26 '11 at 9:24
    
Yes, sorry, just edited the description slightly. I store the unqiue id in a database table, and here I have some (but not all) duplicates occurring. –  Alan Hollis May 26 '11 at 9:26
1  
What define the UniqueKeyFromDatabase ? –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński May 26 '11 at 9:28
    
Thanks everybody, it appears I was being an absolute idiot, and getUniqueIDFromDatabase wasn't actually getting a unique id at all. Thanks again, Alan –  Alan Hollis May 26 '11 at 9:41
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

BigInteger is an (from the JavaDocs)

Immutable arbitrary-precision integer

So that rules out anyone mutating the BigInteger object. I'd look into getUniqueKeyKeyFromDatabase

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3  
I thought this too. Ack in fact you're right, looking at the code I can see what I have done, I'm selecting max from the existing table, then inserting to create a new unique id. But returning the max variable I found earlier. So stupid. Thank you very much! –  Alan Hollis May 26 '11 at 9:31
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You getUniqueKeyFromDatabase() has to be a method which will not return the same value twice. Everything else doesn't matter.

Each thread has it own copy of local variables are they are not shared.

BTW: don't extend Thread, its bad practice which often leads to confusion.

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Thank you very much Peter, after this comment and the Jeff's below, I realised what I've done. I'm returning the max id I've found, and not the new unique id. Really stupid of me :( I also need to go read up on why not to extend threads! Thanks again. –  Alan Hollis May 26 '11 at 9:35
    
If you call max in two threads at once, you will still get the same value twice. I suggest you rethink how you get ids. –  Peter Lawrey May 26 '11 at 10:00
    
Done and done! I now do it properly inserting to the table and returning the newly generated key inside the synchronised method. Which should be fine, I think? –  Alan Hollis May 26 '11 at 10:03
    
Getting the database to generate the id is a good approach. The synchronized method doesn't do anything as each thread has its own object, i.e. you are not synchronising on a shared object. –  Peter Lawrey May 26 '11 at 10:05
1  
Cheers Peter, this is one of the first multi-threaded apps I've done and I immediately jumped to the conclusion I'd done something stupid with the threading. Didn't even think about checking for a simple error else where. On the plus side I've learnt a lot this morning!. Really appreciate yours and all the other responses I've received! –  Alan Hollis May 26 '11 at 10:49
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Your problem is because you're not really synchronizing anything. The getUniqueID() method in class A is synchronized on its own implicit monitor. But that means each time you create a new thread, you're synchronizing each one on itself. Does that make sense ?

You need to synchronize on some shared variable. A quick fix to illustrate the point (but really don't use this in practice) is: In the example below all your threads are synchronizing on the same object ( a shared static ).

class A extends Thread {

    static Object shared = new Object();

    public BigInteger getUniqueID()
    {
       synchronize (shared) {
         BigInteger aUniqueID = new BigInteger(getUniqueKeyFromDatabase);
         return aUniqueID;
       }
    }

}
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Chances are, that the synchronized modifier for getUniqueID() is pointless, as you don't modify any state there. It does not protect the getUniqueKeyFromDatabase() either, because it synchronizes on the instance. This means that every Thread runs without synchronizing with the others.

You could try if

public BigInteger getUniqueID() {
   synchronized (a.class) {
      BigInteger aUniqueID = new BigInteger(getUniqueKeyFromDatabase);
      return aUniqueID;
   } 
}

Works better for you. If it does, you should think about your database design (or whatever happens in getUniqueKeyFromDatabase). Synchonization should really be done by the database, not in client code.

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You must have a problem with the method which returns the unique id. To assure uniqueness of your ids for each object use something like below, for example in you class a.

PS: Class names should start from capital letters. Also as suggested by @Peter Lawrey implement Runnable instead of extending a Thread.

    private static int nextId = 0;
    protected int id;

    public a(){
       this.id = getNextId();
    }
    private static int getNextId(){
        return nextId++;
    }
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