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In my sql query, I count the number of orders in each Hour of day. My query looks something like this:

SELECT   COUNT(dbo.Uputa.ID),{ fn HOUR(dbo.Orders.Date) } AS Hour
FROM      Orders       
WHERE dbo.Orders.Date BETWEEN '2011-05-01' AND '2011-05-26' 
GROUP BY { fn HOUR(dbo.Orders.Date) }
ORDER BY Hour

My problem is that the query returns only existing Hours in dbo.Orders.Date.
For example:

Number   Hour
12         3
12         5

I want to return all hours like this:

 Number      Hour
    0          0
    0          1
    0          2
    12         3
    0          4
    12         5
   ...
    0          23

Does anybody have idea how to accomplish this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use a common table expression to create all hours, then left join your grouped totals to get a result.

with mycte as
(
    SELECT 0 AS MyHour
    UNION ALL
    SELECT MyHour + 1
    FROM mycte 
    WHERE MyHour + 1 < 24
)
SELECT mycte.MyHour, COALESCE(OrderCount,0) FROM mycte
LEFT JOIN 
(
    SELECT  COUNT(dbo.Uputa.ID) AS OrderCount,{ fn HOUR(dbo.Orders.Date) } AS MyHour
    FROM    Orders       
    WHERE   dbo.Orders.Date BETWEEN '2011-05-01' AND '2011-05-26' 
    GROUP BY { fn HOUR(dbo.Orders.Date) }
) h
ON
  h.MyHour = mycte.MyHour;
share|improve this answer
    
not positive of the sql-server syntax on creating that mycte, but theory sound correct... –  DRapp May 26 '11 at 10:54
    
The CTE part was checked before I uploaded the answer. Looks to have worked :D –  Paul Alan Taylor May 26 '11 at 12:17

You can use a CTE to add the missing hours and JOIN these with your original query to fill in the blanks.

SQL Statement

;WITH q (Number, Hour) AS (
    SELECT  0, 1
    UNION ALL
    SELECT  q.Number, q.Hour + 1
    FROM    q
    WHERE   q.Hour < 23
)
SELECT  COALESCE(o.Number, q.Number)
        , q.Hour
FROM    q
        LEFT OUTER JOIN (
            SELECT   COUNT(dbo.Uputa.ID),{ fn HOUR(dbo.Orders.Date) } AS Hour
            FROM      Orders       
            WHERE dbo.Orders.Date BETWEEN '2011-05-01' AND '2011-05-26' 
            GROUP BY { fn HOUR(dbo.Orders.Date) }
        ) o ON o.Hour = q.Hour
ORDER BY 
        q.Hour      

Test Script

;WITH Orders (Number, Hour) AS (
    SELECT 12, 3
    UNION ALL SELECT 12, 5
)
, q (Number, Hour) AS (
    SELECT  0, 1
    UNION ALL
    SELECT  q.Number, q.Hour + 1
    FROM    q
    WHERE   q.Hour < 23
)
SELECT  COALESCE(o.Number, q.Number)
        , q.Hour
FROM    q
        LEFT OUTER JOIN Orders o ON o.Hour = q.Hour
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A 'numbers table' (SQL, Auxiliary table of numbers for example) is in general quite a useful thing to have in your database; if you create one here you can select all rows between 0 and 23 from your numbers table, left join that against your results and you'll get the results you want without the need to create a custom CTE or similar purely for this query.

SELECT   COUNT(dbo.Uputa.ID),n.number AS Hour
FROM     (select number from numbers where number between 0 and 23) n 
             left join Orders o on n.number={ fn HOUR(dbo.Orders.Date) }
WHERE dbo.Orders.Date BETWEEN '2011-05-01' AND '2011-05-26' 
GROUP BY n.number
ORDER BY n.number

(I've worded this as per your example for clarity but in practice I'd try and avoid putting a function in the join criteria to maximise performance.)

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