Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can any one please describe this sort of code to understand Java closure.

public static <T> void sort(List<T> l, final {T, T=>Number} block) {

    Collections.sort(l, new Comparator<T>() {
        public int compare(T arg0, T arg1) {
            return block.invoke(arg0, arg1);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
19  
Java 7 doesn't have closures. Support for closures have been deferred to Java 8. –  axtavt May 26 '11 at 10:24
    
Technically inner classes are closures (they define functions with access to identifiers of an enclosing scope). What Java 7 doesn't have is elegant closures. –  Luke Usherwood May 10 at 9:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 27 down vote accepted

This syntax is described in the BGGA-proposal by Gilad Bracha, Neal Gafter, James Gosling, and Peter von der Ahé.

This snippet of code can be described as follows:

  1. It takes as the second argument a function taking parameters (T, T) and returning Number (and assigns it to parameter block)

  2. It then creates a Comparator<T> out of it. This it does by implementing the compare method by delegating it to a call to block.

  3. Passes this comparator to the Collections.sort method.


Here comes a break down of the syntax:

public static <T> void sort(List<T> l, final {T, T=>Number} block) {
                                             ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

An argument called block which is of type "function that takes two T and returns a Number".

    Collections.sort(l, new Comparator<T>() {
        public int compare(T arg0, T arg1) {
            ...
        }
    }
}

An ordinary call to Collections.sort with an instance of an anonymous subclass of Comparator as second argument...

        ...
            return block.invoke(arg0, arg1);
        ...

...which returns the number computed by the function defined by the block argument.


Put in terms of classical Java, your snippet would correspond to something like

interface Block<T> {
    public int invoke(T arg1, T arg2);
}


class Test {
    public static <T> void sort(List<T> l, final Block<T> block) {
        Collections.sort(l, new Comparator<T>() {
            public int compare(T arg0, T arg1) {
                return block.invoke(arg0, arg1);
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
hay! Its really good derivation –  Subhrajyoti Majumder May 26 '11 at 13:23
1  
Cant wait to have that in Java. Tired of dozes of fire...Event() methods in my observables. –  Jakub Zaverka Apr 23 '12 at 16:26
1  
For a good explanation of the latest state of the lambdas, have a look at cr.openjdk.java.net/~briangoetz/lambda/… –  Bringer128 Apr 24 '12 at 9:45

As @axtavt points out, Java 7 is (unfortunately) not going to have closures. However, Groovy does, runs on the JVM, and integrates very nicely with other Java code. I'd read this for more information.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.