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Well i have the following table(info from pgAdmin):

    CREATE TABLE comments_lemms
(
  comment_id integer,
  freq integer,
  lemm_id integer,
  bm25 real
)
WITH (
  OIDS=FALSE
);
ALTER TABLE comments_lemms OWNER TO postgres;

-- Index: comments_lemms_comment_id_idx

-- DROP INDEX comments_lemms_comment_id_idx;

CREATE INDEX comments_lemms_comment_id_idx
  ON comments_lemms
  USING btree
  (comment_id);

-- Index: comments_lemms_lemm_id_idx

-- DROP INDEX comments_lemms_lemm_id_idx;

CREATE INDEX comments_lemms_lemm_id_idx
  ON comments_lemms
  USING btree
  (lemm_id);

And one more table:

CREATE TABLE comments
(
  id serial NOT NULL,
  nid integer,
  userid integer,
  timest timestamp without time zone,
  lemm_length integer,
  CONSTRAINT comments_pkey PRIMARY KEY (id)
)
WITH (
  OIDS=FALSE
);
ALTER TABLE comments OWNER TO postgres;

-- Index: comments_id_idx

-- DROP INDEX comments_id_idx;

CREATE INDEX comments_id_idx
  ON comments
  USING btree
  (id);

-- Index: comments_nid_idx

-- DROP INDEX comments_nid_idx;

CREATE INDEX comments_nid_idx
  ON comments
  USING btree
  (nid);

in comments_lemms there are 8 million entries, in comments - 270 thousands. Im performing the following sql query:

update comments_lemms set bm25=(select lemm_length from comments where id=comment_id limit 1)

And it takes more than 20 minutes of running and i stop it because pgAdmin looks like its about to crash. Is there any way to modify this query or indexes or whatever in my database to speed up things a bit? I have to run some similar queries in future and it's quite painful to wait more than 30 minutes for each one.

share|improve this question
    
What does it mean when you say "looks like its about to crash?" And is there some reason you are not doing a join? Does postgres not allow update-joins? –  MJB May 26 '11 at 11:07
    
Windows starts screaming that pgAdmin probably stopped working. Because i had no idea about update-joins, im quite a newbie in sql, you see :) I rewrote my query using update join, launched it again and right now im waiting for results to appear. –  Anton May 26 '11 at 11:40
    
Not relevant to question but I believe comments_id_idx is not necessary. Postgres puts a unique index on PK without being told to. –  Andrew Lazarus May 29 '11 at 0:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

in comments_lemms there are 8 million entries, in comments - 270 thousands. Im performing the following sql query:

update comments_lemms set bm25=(select lemm_length from comments where id=comment_id limit 1)

In other words, you're making it go through 8M entries, and for each row you're doing a nested loop with an index loopup. PG won't rewrite/optimize it because of the limit 1 instruction.

Try this instead:

update comments_lemms set bm25 = comments.lemm_length
from comments
where comments.id = comments_lemms.comment_id;

It should do two seq scans and hash or merge join them together, then proceed with the update in one go.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, after i discovered update joins(thanks to MJB's comment above) i rewrote query in exactly the same manner as you did. Launched and it works for 20 minutes now. I even performed vacuum analyze on both these tables before running my query. Also selecting count(*) from comments_lemms takes 48 seconds, is it okay? –  Anton May 26 '11 at 11:46
    
sounds reasonable for 8M entries, yeah. :-) –  Denis de Bernardy May 26 '11 at 11:49
    
Gee, indexes should help me to speed up selecting with WHERE comment_id in or lemm_id in, should they? You have no idea how desperately it sounds in my head, because i have to make LOTS of complicated reports with this table :) –  Anton May 26 '11 at 11:57
    
No amount of indexes will help if you're selecting the entire table. In such cases, it's faster to read through the whole table sequentially than it is to randomly access each row by following the index. –  Denis de Bernardy May 26 '11 at 12:08
2  
It's also probable that all those previous aborted update attempts have bloated the heck out of your table. Run a Cluster on it and then see if your new update isn't quite so slow. –  Scott Marlowe May 26 '11 at 12:51

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