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My team is about to make a release, and we want to tag the release in subversion. The release (v.1) consists of several applications and they all reference shared libraries. I'v read that the most commonly used way to organize trunk/branches/tags is to do it per project.

Question #1: So to make a release with this structure will I have to tags each and every project separatly? What I'm thinking is that I could create several levels of trunk/branches/tags, one in the root and one for each project. This would allow me to create a tag for all my code from the root trunk.

would look something like this:
/rep
    /trunk
        /office
            /project1
                /trunk
                /branches
                /tags
            /project2
                /trunk
                /branches
                /tags
        /shared
            /shared_project
                /trunk
                /branches
                /tags
    /tags
    /branches

Question #2: If my solution to Q#1 is a bad idea and I have to tag each project for itself, what then, if we later find a bug in v.1 and need to make a hotfix. Do I then again have to manually switch each project to the v.1 tag and branch each of them to a development branch?

Edit

Thank you for your answers. I've decided that I'm gonna convince my team to move to Mercurical, seems like the right VCS for how we want to work. I've also looked at git but hq looks more smooth.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since all the projects are versioned independently, Tagging each project separately will give you the most flexibility.

If you are worried about the effort required to tag all these projects you can easily do this with the svn command line client

svn cp <branch> <tag> -m"tagging release v.1"

Nesting like you showed in your question will end up in an unmaintainable mess.

An example

Assume your repository is located on http://mysvn/ has the following layout:

/rep
  /trunk
        /project1
        /project2
        /shared_project
  /tags
  /branches

When you want to tag the projects from trunk you can run the following commands from the command line.

svn cp "http://mysvn/trunk/project1" "http://mysvn/tags/project1 v.1" -m"tagging release v.1" 
svn cp "http://mysvn/trunk/project2" "http://mysvn/tags/project2 v.1" -m"tagging release v.1" 
svn cp "http://mysvn/trunk/shared_project" "http://mysvn/tags/shared_project v.1" -m"tagging release v.1" 

The result is the following repository layout

/rep
  /trunk
        /project1
        /project2
        /shared_project
  /tags
        /project1 v.1
        /project2 v.1
        /shared_project v.1
  /branches

Another approach assumes your repository has the following layout:

/rep
  /project1
     /trunk
     /tags
     /branches
  /project2
     /trunk
     /tags
     /branches
  /shared_project
     /trunk
     /tags
     /branches

In this case you will tag with the following commands:

svn cp "http://mysvn/project1/trunk/" "http://mysvn/project1/tags/v.1" -m"tagging release v.1" 
svn cp "http://mysvn/project2/trunk/" "http://mysvn/project2/tags/v.1" -m"tagging release v.1" 
svn cp "http://mysvn/shared_project/trunk/" "http://mysvn/shared_project/tags/v.1" -m"tagging release v.1" 

This will put your repository in the following state:

/rep
  /project1
     /trunk
     /tags
       /v.1
     /branches
  /project2
     /trunk
     /tags
        /v.1
     /branches
  /shared_project
     /trunk
     /tags
        /v.1
     /branches

Personally I prefer the first approach as it keeps the folders under tags on the same level as in trunk and you don't end up with a bunch of folders named "v.1". In the end it's a question of preference.

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I'm no svn expert. Will this command tag all my projects in my repository independently? –  Paw Baltzersen May 27 '11 at 6:59
    
Branching and tagging in subversion is all just the "copy" command. The command I put is to create a tag of one project. I'll extend the answer with some examples –  Filip De Vos May 27 '11 at 7:39

This structure seems wrong to me:

/rep
    /trunk
        /office
            /project1
                /trunk

Why is there a trunk below /rep? It should be:

/rep
    /office
        /project1
            /trunk

Next, you need to create a tag which contains all the versions at a specific time. I suggest to create an ueberproject which contains the other projects like /rep/all/tag/1.0/office/project1

Fill the ueberproject with svn copy or using svn:external.

The former uses SVN like a versioned file system: You create copies of the files you want to work on.

The latter creates lightweight links to bits and pieces which you need. In SVN, both operations cost about the same (svn copy also creates a couple of links internally; it doesn't actually copy anything!)

Fixing bugs

If you find a bug in v1, you should export the project into a DCVS like Mercurial or Git, create branches there, fix the bug.

Like all centralized VCS, SVN isn't really good at branching and merging. Granted, the operation isn't as expensive time-wise as in, say, CVS, but logically, it's a mess.

See http://hginit.com/ for a longer explanation why you don't want to start with branches in Subversion.

If you still want to try, read and understand this: http://tortoisesvn.net/docs/release/TortoiseSVN_en/tsvn-dug-merge.html

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1  
snuffybear.com/ucm_branch.htm also useful –  BonyT May 26 '11 at 13:27

First let me say there is no right answer here (although there are lots of wrong ones).

If you put each deployable item in a separate branch you could end up with a maintenance headache trying to maintain a list of what's compatible with what. The only time I would advocate doing this is if you are talking about quite separate products that will be definitely deployed independently, e.g. a software creator that creates several different applications, sold individually and versioned independently.

If this is internal though, it's far easier to manage one repository and branch/tag it as an entirety. If an item has not been changed then you do not need to deploy it - all you try to do is make sure that the live system is represented by a branch or tag in the repository.

For the shared libraries you should use SVN-externals - store the common libraries in a separate assembly and use externals to include them in the the build.

 /rep
     /trunk
           /office
                  /project1
                  /project2
                  /project3

         /Release 1.0
           /office
                  /project1
                  /project2
                  /project3
         /Release 1.1
           /office
                  /project1
                  /project2
                  /project3
        /Release 2.0
           /office
                  /project1
                  /project2
                  /project3
     /tags
        /Release 1.0
           /office
                  /project1
                  /project2
                  /project3
        /Release 1.1
           /office
                  /project1
                  /project2
                  /project3
        /Release 2.0
           /office
                  /project1
                  /project2
                  /project3

Notice that I have tags and branches - the tags are pointers to a single revision that corresponds with a deployment. The branches begin where the corresponding tag does, but they are where you put code fixes in the event you need to hot-fix production systems.

So in answer to 2) yes, if you have a bug in Release 2.0 which was deployed 2 weeks ago, you need to switch to working in the R2.0 branch, fix the bug, then merge the fix back into trunk so that it gets included in future releases as well.

Personally I maintain several branches on my local disk rather than using switch which I find confusing.

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here it is my opinion about your questions.

Q1: You can use one repository for all of your projects as you did. You can make snaptshots (tags) of each project before it's deployed on production server e.g. tag project1 version in trunk/office/project1/tags

However to me is more correctly that structure:

/rep
   /trunk
     /project1
     /project2
     /shared
   /tags/
     /project1
     /project2
     /shared
   /branches
     /project1
     /project2
     /shared

In tht way when you do checkout for the trunk you will get in once place all trunk version of your project.

Q2. If you find a bug in the tag v1 you need to switch from that tag in the branch or fix the bug in the trunk and make a new deploy on the production server plus new tag - this depends on your development cycle.

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