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I need to do a query like this

select * from calendar where (select to_char(now(), 'day')) = true;

but this is invalid and fails with ERROR: failed to find conversion function from unknown to boolean.

The query I'm trying write, when run today would boil down to

select * from calendar where thursday = true;

But tomorrow, it should be

select * from calendar where friday = true;

The table has this schema

mbta=# \d calendar
             Table "public.calendar"
   Column   |          Type          | Modifiers 
------------+------------------------+-----------
 service_id | character varying(255) | not null
 monday     | boolean                | 
 tuesday    | boolean                | 
 wednesday  | boolean                | 
 thursday   | boolean                | 
 friday     | boolean                | 
 saturday   | boolean                | 
 sunday     | boolean                | 
 start_date | integer                | 
 end_date   | integer                | 

How can I write this query correctly?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's an ugly schema... A bunch of alternatives:

  1. Replace 'monday, tuesday... ' fields by a single integer field, to be interpreted as a bit mask - or use the bit-string data type

  2. Replace them by a single field that contatins an array of integers (days of week).

  3. Denormalize to an extra table, with a single day_of_week field and a FK to your calendar table.

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Thanks I'll take your advice and change the schema. –  dan May 26 '11 at 14:49

Yes, there is a solution. Obviously, you can't use the result of a subselect in place of a column, but you can rearrange the relation to suit that sort of query. First, build a subselect that transposes the individual columns into a single column

SELECT calendar.*, 'monday' AS weekday, monday AS dayvalue FROM calendar
UNION ALL
SELECT calendar.*, 'tuesday' AS weekday, tuesday AS dayvalue FROM calendar
UNION ALL
SELECT calendar.*, 'wednesday' AS weekday, wednesday AS dayvalue FROM calendar
UNION ALL
SELECT calendar.*, 'thursday' AS weekday, thursday AS dayvalue FROM calendar
UNION ALL
SELECT calendar.*, 'friday' AS weekday, friday AS dayvalue FROM calendar
UNION ALL
SELECT calendar.*, 'saturday' AS weekday, saturday AS dayvalue FROM calendar
UNION ALL
SELECT calendar.*, 'sunday' AS weekday, sunday AS dayvalue FROM calendar

Then you can wrap this all up as a subselect and pick out just the rows with the right weekday:

SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT calendar.*, 'monday' AS weekday, monday AS dayvalue FROM calendar
    UNION ALL
    SELECT calendar.*, 'tuesday' AS weekday, tuesday AS dayvalue FROM calendar
    UNION ALL
    ...         -- You get the idea.
    UNION ALL
    SELECT calendar.*, 'sunday' AS weekday, sunday AS dayvalue FROM calendar
) AS ss WHERE to_char(now(), 'day') = ss.weekday AND dayvalue = true; 
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Thanks for the elaborate answer. I think it's a good sign that things will be easier if I change the schema. –  dan May 26 '11 at 14:49
select * from calendar where (to_char(now(), 'day') != 'Monday' || monday) && (to_char(now(), 'day') != 'Tuesday' || tuesday) && …

Given the new schema, I think something like this is your best bet.

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I added some info above. Does this help? –  dan May 26 '11 at 13:48
    
Do you have the choice to modify your datastructure. You should have a second table to associate your calendar periods (start, end) with one or more day of the week. It would be easier to make your query then I think. –  Kaltezar May 26 '11 at 14:09
    
@dan: Very enlightening. I revised my answer to take into account the new information. –  Seth Robertson May 26 '11 at 14:10
    
I tried your query and I get ERROR: operator does not exist: boolean || boolean –  dan May 26 '11 at 14:17
    
@dan: Ah, sorry. Too many languages. SQL uses AND for && and OR for ||. –  Seth Robertson May 26 '11 at 14:33

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