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Let's say I have a class A that has a list of related elements (type of elements not relevant):

public class A {
  private List<String> list;

  public List<String> getList() {
    return list;
  }

  public void addElement(String element) {
    list.add(element);
  }
}

Now I want access to this list from another class, Client. I need to add a new element. The question, a more phylosophical one, is how best is this done from a design point of view.

public class Client {
  private A a = new A();

  public void method1() {
    a.getList().add("");
  }

  public void method2() {
    a.addElement("");
  }    
}

If anyone could point out any advantage of any of these methods, would be much appreciated. Thanks.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Generally your getList() method is considered bad style. If class A returns a reference to its actual List, than a caller might call clear() on that list, or add a million elements to it, or so who-knows-what-all. It's a much better idea to return only an Iterator, or only a read-only view of the List using Collections.unmodifiableList().

This means your solution 2, addElement() is better; the addElement() method might contain code to validate the added elements, limit the size of the list, or whatever. And clear() would not be accessible.

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Yeah, it's mainly what I was thinking about. Although good idea from my point of view with the read-only view over the list. –  Deelazee May 26 '11 at 14:02

If your intention is to really expose the list, method2 is usually a better OOP-style. (Since by using method2 you'll get addAll etc for free.)

Examples of this pattern in the standard API:

The documentation should take care to say something like The object is backed by the returned collection, so modifications will ...


The drawback is that by exposing the list you allow clients to do remove and so on, so if your intention is to just collect items through add then method1 may still be a better choice.

Examples of this pattern in the standard API:

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method2 is better because the client doesnt need to bother with the list implementation. if class A changes its data structure, the client is not affected.

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You should provide a method for adding element on class A. Returning the original List is wrong from the design point of view because the user of your class has full access to it.

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You should most definitely hide the underlying list in class A. A should not provide a getList() method if possible.

Class B should use a.addElement() exclusively. And, if B needs to read from the list in A, A should provide methods for accessing the list instead of giving B the entire list.

One of the main tenants of OO programming is Encapsulation. Which means that you should hide the underlying implementation of your classes, and abstract out that low-level info.

To your specific question, you will want to use method2(). You shouldn't even be able to use a.getList() from class B if you are following proper OO principles.

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I would choose

public void method2() {
    a.addElement("");  
} 

Because mantains hidden the list inside A. Of course this depends on how related is the list to A if only instances of A should get a reference to the list then this is my choice.
One other reason might be that giving away the list could lead to clients removing items, you might want to avoid clients to consider the list as their own, it's A's, keep it safe! :P

Otherwise the list does not belong to A and should be removed from it.

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When coding, you should consider the maintenance process. The less the classes know about each other the better it it is.
The client should only know that A can have elements .... so I will consider the second design as being much better.

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I wouldn't give access to the list (i.e. getList()) its good however that you added a addElement method. That is a good idea because you can put restrictions on what can be added to the list in that method.

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