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$(document).ready(function(){
    console.log('a');
});

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({appId: '{/literal}{$fbAppId}{literal}',
            status: true,
            cookie: true,
            xfbml: true});

    FB.Event.subscribe('edge.create', function(response) {
        // Do something, e.g. track the click on the "Like" button here
        if(!liked)
        {
            {/literal}$.get('http://{$rooturl}/promotions/likecheck.php?CID={$CID}&ctype={$campaignTable}');{literal}
            liked=true;
        }
    });
};
(function() {
    console.log('b');
    var e = document.createElement('script');
    e.type = 'text/javascript';
    e.src = document.location.protocol + '//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js';
    e.async = true;
    document.getElementById('fb-root').appendChild(e);
}());

I'm noticing that when I run this javascript in my console i get the output:

b
a

I'm wondering what does it mean to wrap a function in parenthesis in javascript such as here:

    (function() {
    console.log('b');
    var e = document.createElement('script');
    e.type = 'text/javascript';
    e.src = document.location.protocol + '//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js';
    e.async = true;
    document.getElementById('fb-root').appendChild(e);
}());

Is the intention of doing this to make this function the first executed in a script tag?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is sometimes termed as a "self-invoking function", though that terminology may be misleading. As stated, it is a way to create an anonymous function, not save the reference anywhere and then invoke it immediately.

The function will never be executed again. You might question the usefulness of this, but it's actually a good practice to indicate this is the actual program code, separate from function or other object definitions.

However, you still have to use the var keyword to ensure you don't pollute the global namespace.

An Example:

var outside = "Hello Outside";
(function()
{
  alert(outside); // Works as expected.

  // Define some variable and see what happens.
  globalVar = "Hello World, redux";
  var localVar = "Hello World";
}());

alert(globalVar);
alert(localVar); // Get an error: "localVar is not defined"
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The purpose of doing that is merely to create a private lexical scope so that variables declared for use by that stretch of code don't pollute the global namespace. It does not force the code to be executed "first".

So for example, that variable "e" will be gone after the function executes, and there'll be no "e" floating around to bother any other code.

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This is a way of creating a function (with its own closure, and variables) and invoking it immediately, but without polluting the global namespace.

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