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Hello I'm seeking a Perl one-liner if possible, to scan all of our Javascript files, to find so-called "rogue commas". That is, commas that come at the end of an array or object data structure, and therefore commas that come immediately before either an ']' or '}' character.

The main challenge I'm encountering is how to make the regex that checks for ] or } non-greedy. The regex needs to span multiple lines, since the comma could end one line, followed by the } or ] on the next line, but I've figured out how to do that with the help of the book Minimal Perl.

Also, I'd like to be able to pipe a number of files to this Perl regex (via find/xargs), and so I'd like to print the name of the input file, and the line number within that file.

Below are various attempts of mine that are not particularly close to working straight from my bash history. Thanks in advance:

find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,\s+$/ and print $_;' find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,\s+/ and print $_;' find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,\s+\]/ and print $_;' find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,\s+[\]\}]/ and print $_;' find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,\s+[\]\}]/ and print $_;' | wc -l find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,\s+[\]\}]/ and print $_;' | wc -l find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,\s+}/ and print $_;' | wc -l find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,\s+}?/ and print $_;' | wc -l find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,\s+}+?/ and print $_;' | wc -l find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,$/' and print $_;' find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/,$/ and print $_;' find winhome/workspace/SsuExt4Zoura/quotetool/js
-name "*.js" | xargs perl -00 -wnl -e '/\,$/ and print $_;'
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might be a good candidate for server fault. –  Denis May 26 '11 at 14:40
1  
What’s wrong with having a final comma? That makes it easy to add more elements. –  tchrist May 26 '11 at 15:12
    
Perhaps you should mention why these attempts are not working. –  TLP May 26 '11 at 15:31
1  
@tchrist: because it's sadly not legal javascript and so some browsers will choke on it –  ysth May 26 '11 at 15:43
    
Actually I think it is valid Javascript but IE7 chokes on it. Anyway, I have since come to the realization that a Perl regex might not be the answer, and am instead "trying" to use JsLint, but that is a whole other issue ;) Long story short: for error-detection software to terminate with the un-informative message "Stopping" is an egregious violation of the principle of least surprise –  George Jempty May 27 '11 at 14:13
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

With the -00 switch, you change the record separator, and (probably) get the whole file in one line, which allows you to find multi-line trailing commas. However, it also makes the print $_ print the whole line. What you probably want is printing the file name:

print $ARGV if /,\s*[\]\}]/;

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Most of these look like a decent approach to the problem, with one small issue. You probably want ,\s*(?:$|[\]\}]) rather than ,\s+(?:$|[\]\}]) as there may not be even one space. Your + quantifier might miss forms like ,].

Having said that, JavaScript can be pretty subtle, and you might well encounter comments and other stuff, which might legitimately end with a comma before something unexpected, like the end of the file or a }. A cheap solution might be to use a perl s/// form to simply remove all the comments before applying your tests.

If you're handling JSON, JSON::XS can enforce validity with its relaxed option.

If you need real validation, something like JSLint is probably the way to go. I've had a lot of success with using Rhino to embed JavaScript (a bit less using Perl with SpiderMonkey) and using this as a set of tests against JavaScript code would be a nice way to ensure reliability over time.

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An easy solution to this problem is to use comma-first style. Since commas never come at the end of a line, there is never a 'trailing comma'.

For example:

var myObj = { foo: 1
            , bar: 2
            , baz: 4
            }

You can easily detect if a comma is missing, it's obvious which elements belong to what set of braces, and there's never a 'trailing comma problem'.

See also https://gist.github.com/357981

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How does this answer the question regarding a Perl regex for detecting this sort of thing that already may exist in the code? –  George Jempty May 30 '11 at 10:19
    
@George While it's important to give technically correct answers to questions, it is also important to answer the intent of the question. Folks had already suggested fixes, so I suggested an alternative approach. Much like if someone asked, "How do I parse HTML using regex" or "How can I stop it from hurting when I throw salt in my eyes", one helpful answer is "Don't do that". –  Thom Blake May 31 '11 at 13:41
    
Here I am, back 2 years later, using a useful answer to my own question, and again, your 'answer' is unhelpful. It's as though I'm trying to cure a disease and your answer is "avoid the disease". –  George Jempty Jul 24 '13 at 20:46
    
@George More like you're trying to treat a bullet wound in your foot, and I said "Stop shooting yourself in the foot", and you're still shooting yourself in the foot 2 years later. –  Thom Blake Aug 5 '13 at 19:51
    
I'm not, it's code I've inherited –  George Jempty Aug 5 '13 at 21:23
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