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Copy elision is a neat optimization technique and in some cases relying on copy elision can actually be faster than passing around references "by hand".

So, let's assume you have identified a critical code path where you rely on the fact that the copy elision is performed by your compiler for the code path for maximum performance.

But now you are relying on a compiler optimization.

Is there any (compiler specific, obviously) way to ensure that the copy elision is actually performed and have the compiler (or another tool) generate a warning/error if the copy elision cannot be performed?

(I'm thinking of something remotely similar to Visual C++'s __forceinline than will generate a warning if the function marked thus isn't inlined by the compiler.)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not really, except putting an assert(false); in the copy constructor.

Otherwise use your favorite profiler to measure that the interesting parts of your app is fast enough.

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Hmm ... the idea with the assert(false) in the copy operator seems nice. For std containers and such stuff, maybe one can whip up a proxy/wrapper object that has an assert in its copy operator. –  Martin Ba May 26 '11 at 15:20
    
The copy [assignment] operator doesn't affect pass-by-value though. –  Mark B May 26 '11 at 16:14
    
@Mark: You are right. The assert has go into the copy constructor (as this is the one thing we want to make sure isn't called). –  Martin Ba May 27 '11 at 7:36

No.

But you can write an equivalent, although completely unreadable, code:

BigObj f()
{
    BigObj x(g());
    x.someMethod();
    return x;
}

//...
BigObj z = f();
//...

is translated (with copy elision) to:

void f(BigObj* obj)
{
    new(obj) BigObj(g());
    obj->someMethod();
}

//...
char z[sizeof(BigObj)];
f((BigObj*)&z[0]);
//...
((BigObj*)&z[0])->~BigObj();

But seriously, just write your code in such a way that the compiler can elide the copy. I.e. return only one object without branching:

BigObj f()
{
    BigObj x, y;
    // use x and y
    if(condition)
        return x;
    else
        return y;
    // cannot be elided
}


BigObj f()
{
    if(condition)
    {
        BigObj x;
        return x;
    }
    else
    {
        BigObj y;
        return y;
    }
    // can be elided
}
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1  
@MSalters mentioned a neat technique to allow different objects to be returned and still get copy elision: If the condition is true, just swap both and always return the first. –  Xeo May 26 '11 at 15:06
2  
@Xeo: please note that swap was just a special case. In general, you can transform a funtion with multiple returns to a single return by adding a T return_value on top, changing every return statement into an assignment to return_value, and finally returning return_value. Often, this pattern can be optimized further, e.g. by initializing return_value with a sensible value. –  MSalters May 27 '11 at 8:12

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