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How do I unit test a Business Layer method that makes call to WCF service?

example:

public void SendData(DataUnit dataUnit)
{

        //this is WCF call
        SomeServiceClient svc = new SomeServiceClient();

        svc.SomeMethod(dataUnit);

}

Is there a way I can mock SomeServiceClient in my Unit test project?

share|improve this question
    
what I do these cases to to use Moq to mock the service interface. – Yaur May 26 '11 at 14:50
1  
There's nothing special about WCF here (though the fact that the client class implements an interface may help you). This would be exactly the same problem if SendData needed to call some class library method. – John Saunders May 26 '11 at 14:51
    
@Yakur: How do i tell NUnit Framework that if SomeServiceClient is called, use this mock object. Since SomeServiceClient is created inside the BL, i dont know how do i pass that. – Asdfg May 26 '11 at 14:57
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Your problem here is that you have tightly coupled your Business Layer to your WCF service - you actually create a new instance of the service client within the Business Layer, meaning that it is now impossible to call the SendData method without also calling the service methods.

The best solution here is to introduce dependency injection to your architecture.

At its simplest, all you do is pass an instance of your service class into your Business Layer. This is often done at class construction time using a constructor parameter.

public class BusinessClass
{
    private ISomeServiceClient _svc;

    public BusinessClass(ISomeServiceClient svc)
    {
        _svc = svc;
    }

    public void SendData(DataUnit dataUnit)
    {
       _svc.SomeMethod(dataUnit);
    }
}

Note that the code above is a design pattern, with absolutely no reliance upon any framework like an Inversion of Control container.

If it is your company's policy not to use such frameworks (an insane policy by the way), you can still manually inject your mock instances of the service inside your unit tests.

share|improve this answer
    
cant use Dependency framework in the project. Company policy. :( – Asdfg May 26 '11 at 14:55
6  
There is a difference between dependency injection as an architectural pattern and the use of a DI framework or an IOC container. – David Hall May 26 '11 at 14:58
    
great answer. I really appreciate your help. – Asdfg May 26 '11 at 15:22

You should separate your service call from your business layer:

Using the demo below, your Business Layer method that you listed would now look like this:

public void SendData(IMyInterface myInterface, DataUnit dataUnit)
{

        myInterface.SomeMethod(dataUnit);

}

Pass in a RealThing if you want to do the service call, pass in a TestThing if you just want to run a test:

public interface IMyInterface
{
   void SomeMethod(DataUnit x);
}

public class RealThing : IMyInterface
{
   public void SomeMethod(DataUnit x)
   {
       SomeServiceClient svc = new SomeServiceClient();
       svc.SomeMethod(x);
   }
}

public class TestThing : IMyInterface
{
   public void SomeMethod(DataUnit x)
   {
       // do your test here
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
will this not make me implement SomeMethod at two places? If i change something in the RealThing class, i may have to come and change the same thing in my TestThing's SomeMethod. Am i getting it wrong? – Asdfg May 26 '11 at 15:04

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