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I'm working with a 3rd party vendor who has done the SP 2010 integration of a small site. I've noticed that our incredibly simple login page is nearly 3.2 megabytes. The users of this site are the general public and will include those in rural areas who are still on dial-up. That would obviously be a terrible user experience. It's not so great for those on high-speed connections, IMO (just wasted bandwidth).

Digging into the page, I see that 2.2 megs of the page weight comes from JavaScript files marked debug. I can't see any reason why we should be sending these debug files to end users.

Can these files not be served to users?

Here's a YSlow screenshot, http://i.stack.imgur.com/msGUm.jpg

Also, do we really need to be serving core.css (192k) to end users? Is core.css all the "admin" type of SP css?

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1 Answer 1

Yes, you can serve the minimized version of the javascript files to your end users. There are a couple of ways you can do that. If you are using the ScriptManager tag in the master page there is a property that you can set to control this behavior: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.ui.scriptmanager.scriptmode.aspx

Or as referenced in that page, there is a way to use that setting plus a web.config file setting to control this behavior.

More info on SharePoint's JavaScript files here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee539757.aspx

As for core.css, it is impossible to know if your 3rd party vendor has relied on anything in core.css so if you have concerns that's something you should bring up with them.

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Serving minified files would be good, but not serving files you don't need is even better. Why would production need to serve files marked debug? Debug implies development. Even if the files are minified to 500k instead of 2.2 megs, that's still 500k you're serving that users don't need. –  magenta placenta May 27 '11 at 13:40
    
Production would never need to serve debug versions of those files. That's why the minified versions of those files exist. You should do two things...make sure those files are aggressively cached and work with your design team to design you master page & site so that anonymous users only get the files that they need. –  Mark Mascolino May 27 '11 at 19:46
    
Why do end users need those files (even minified)? They don't, right? What I'm asking is how to not serve .js files that aren't needed in production. –  magenta placenta May 27 '11 at 19:56
    
It depends on what you expect end users to do with your site and what capabilities you are using from the core product. –  Mark Mascolino May 27 '11 at 20:21

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