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I REALLY love lambdas and having the ability to use them in C++ is a pleasure. But, as I'm used to Haskell, where lambdas fit really well into the syntax, I'm struggling with how to use them in C++ without writing unreadable cluttered long code lines.

So, as an example, suppose I'd write this:

vector<double> foo(10,0.2);
for_each(foo.begin(), foo.end(), [](double x){ std::cout << x << " ";})

this is not so difficult to read, the lambda expression is pretty small. But if I have a two or three line long function inside that for_each, this could become a problem for my code-reading-skills:

vector<double> foo(10,0.2);
randomNumberGenerator bar;
for_each(foo.begin(), foo.end(), [](double x){ std::cout << "hello!"; x+=bar()/(1+bar()); std::cout << x << " ";})
//sorry, I couldn't think of a less stupid example... 

This line is starting to get annoyingly long and difficult to read for my taste...

What is your preferred code conventions for this case? Should I write:

for_each(foo.begin(), foo.end(), 
          [] (double x) {
                std::cout << "hello!"
                x += bar()/(1+bar());
                std::cout << x << " ";
          });

or something like it? I still think this syntax feels a bit unnatural and difficult to read... :(

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1  
I like the last option, except that you place the opening brace incorrectly. :-) –  Bo Persson May 26 '11 at 19:55
    
why is this not "subjective and argumentative"? –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 26 '11 at 19:57
    
If you want it shorter, also use boost range which takes the container only as first argument. (boost::for_each(foo, [](){...});) –  Viktor Sehr Nov 17 '11 at 22:47
    
Interestingly, this is exactly what I did in my question hoping for better readability. –  Keugyeol May 2 at 4:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I usually go for

for_each(foo.begin(), foo.end(), [](double x) {
    std::cout << "hello!"
    x += bar()/(1+bar());
    std::cout << x << " ";
});

I've written some several hundred line lambdas.

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1  
+1: I haven't yet written many lambdas, but from reading them when learning about them the often look like the body of a loop or other block. In those situations, having the lambda code inline is as natural as having your loop code inline. I think you should use the same reasons for moving lambda contents out-of-line (or not moving the contents out-of-line) as you'd use for other loop bodies. –  Michael Burr May 26 '11 at 19:26

If you prefer, you can name your lambda separately with auto:

auto const baz = [](double x)
{
    std::cout << "hello!"
    x += bar()/(1+bar());
    std::cout << x << " ";
};
std::for_each(foo.begin(), foo.end(), baz);
share|improve this answer

Hmm...

for_each(foo.begin(), foo.end(), 
    [] (double x)
    {
        std::cout << "hello!"
        x += bar()/(1+bar());
        std::cout << x << " ";
    });

for (auto x : foo)
{
    std::cout << "hello!";
    x += bar()/(1+bar());
    std::cout << x << " ";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe an algorithm other than for_each would have made for a better example here, but the for loop here is much more natural to me. –  Keith Layne Nov 17 '11 at 2:31

I like to look at lambdas as just another function declaration, and thus, follow the same conventions that I use for other functions, within reason:

// when lambdas are present, I break the enveloping method params
for_each(
  foo.begin(), 
  foo.end(),           
  [] (double x)
  // I also like to split the brackets, just like with any function
  {
     std::cout << "hello!" 
     x += bar()/(1+bar());                
    std::cout << x << " ";          
  }); // the closing parenthesis is left with the closing bracket
share|improve this answer

I'd say if the code for the lambda is more than one or perhaps two statements, it should be a separate named function.

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4  
IMO, that should only be necessary if you intend to re-use the code elsewhere. –  Puppy May 26 '11 at 19:12
    
IMO, it is necessary if you want the code to be readable, understandable and testable –  nbt May 26 '11 at 19:17
    
A named lambda is less readable than a named function? That's about as subjective as it gets. –  ildjarn May 26 '11 at 19:41
1  
@ildjarn Did I say that? Oh look, I didn't! I said a named function was more readable than a lambda. Most people would take that to mean an unnamed one. But in any case, yes. I believe that named functions are clearer than named lambdas, and I suspect 99% of C++ programmers would be with me on this. Sigh. We have lived through the horrors of template misuse - I suppose we must now go through it again with lambdas. –  nbt May 26 '11 at 19:46

Post mine

std::vector<int> a;
std::find_if(a.begin()
           , a.end()
           , [&](int i)
             {
                 return i == 0;
             });
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