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I am trying to establish a many-to-one relationship. The entity that represents the “many” has a navigation property pointing back to the parent entity. It looks like this:

public abstract class BaseEntity
{

    /// <summary>
    /// Key Field for all entities
    /// </summary>
    /// 
    [Key, DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
    public Guid Id { get; set; }


    /// <summary>
    /// Date entity was created
    /// </summary>
    public DateTime DateCreated { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Last date Modified
    /// </summary>
    public DateTime DateModified { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// keep track of Row Version used for concurrency
    /// </summary>
    [Timestamp]
    public Byte[] RowVersion { get; set; }

}

public abstract class Document : BaseEntity
{
    #region Primitive Properties   


    /// <summary>
    /// Boolean value to determine if Document is in an active state
    /// </summary>
    public bool IsActive { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Document comments and information
    /// </summary>
    [Required]
    public string Description { get; set; }

    #endregion

    #region Navigation Properties

    public ICollection<Comment> Comments { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// FK back to User who owns document
    /// </summary>
    //public Guid OwnerId { get; set; }

    public Guid OwnerId { get; set; }
    /// <summary>
    /// Navigation Back to User who owns document
    /// </summary>
    public User Owner { get; set; }

    #endregion
}

public class Project : BaseEntity
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string ProjectNumber { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }

    public string CreatedBy { get; set; }
    public string ModifiedBy { get; set; }
    public string Currency { get; set; }

    #region Navigation Properties

    public virtual Address Address { get; set; }
    public virtual CompanyCode CompanyCode { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Contact> TeamMembers { get; set; }

    #endregion
}    

 public class Rfi : Document
 {
    public string Number { get; set; }

    #region Navigation Properties

    //This points back to a Project Entity
    public virtual Guid ProjectId { get; set; }
    public virtual Project Project { get; set; }

    #endregion
}

So, when I insert the above entity, I am passing the ProjectId from the application into the Rfi entity (not the entire Project entity). Everything saves fine. The issue I am having is, when I pull the Rfi object back out of the database, the ProjectId is being populated, but the Project entity is null. I am using Lazy Loading, by default. Do I need to specify a navigation property on the Project entity, too? I don’t really want to. Unless, I can perform a mapping on my Rfi to accomplish this.

Update: I assumed EF 4.1 would load my objects for me, but it seems, sometimes I need to explicitly include what objects I want to load. I am not entirely sure why. I am using a repository to query my entities. Here is the method I used to query the Rfi object:

    public IQueryable<TEntity> GetQuery(Expression<Func<TEntity, bool>> predicate)
    {
       return _context.Set<TEntity>().AsQueryable();
    }

What I ended up doing, in my Service layer I call it like this:

public Rfi FindByNumber(string number)
{
     var rfi = rfiRepository.GetQuery(r => r.Number == number).Include(r => r.Project).Single;
     return rfi
}
share|improve this question
    
How does the Project and the Document class look? You don't need necessarily a navigation property on the other side. What you are describing should normally work. The problem is probably hidden in the other classes or any additional mapping. –  Slauma May 26 '11 at 20:46
    
I updated the code samples. Document is derived from the BaseEntity type. –  DDiVita May 26 '11 at 21:17
    
Are you using SQL Server? I think DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity doesn't work with a Guid in SQL Server (it's not Identity in the DB although the model allows this setting). But this is probably not the reason for your problem. Does eager loading with Include of the Project property work? –  Slauma May 26 '11 at 21:41
    
I am using SQL server and it works. –  DDiVita May 26 '11 at 21:46
    
Sorry, you're right, it was limitation in EF 1. Since EF 4 it works. –  Slauma May 26 '11 at 22:04

2 Answers 2

You must make your navigation properties virtual for Lazy Loading to work.

While this makes sense implementation-wise, EF's strategy of ignoring the problem and just returning null is a terrible design decision.

NHibernate, on the other hand, by default doesn't let you use classes that don't have all of their properties virtual.

To avoid this problem, I wrote a test that verifies every reference property is marked as virtual. That way I find out immediately, instead of dealing with strange bugs down the road.


You can also try specifying the FK/Navigation properties explicitly:

public Guid ProjectId { get; set; }
[ForeignKey("ProjectId")]
public virtual Project Project { get; set; }
share|improve this answer
    
They are? If you look at my Rfi object the properties are set to virtual. –  DDiVita May 27 '11 at 12:36
    
@DDiVita: Oh, I saw some properties that weren't (Owner, Comments) and didn't actually check Project. Try making those virtual, and check my last edit too. –  Diego Mijelshon May 27 '11 at 12:44
    
Made the changes and still didn't work. –  DDiVita May 27 '11 at 12:53
    
While wasn't your problem, I've been scratching my head all day over why I was getting nulls back and this answer reminded me - virtual was missing in one class! So simple to forget and nothing warns you. I've had a number of struggles with an MVC project and all have been one line, if not one word fixes due to something obscure you need to remember. –  tjmoore May 1 '12 at 21:27
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Turns out the mapping I created for the proeprty was creating a duplicate ID in the database. I had, for example, ProjectId and Project_ID in the database. I was populating ProjectId when a new item was saved to the context, but the _ID was not being populated. This is what EF 4.1 is using to relate the data. In my mapping I was tring to set the Project so it would not CascadeOnDelete. This is what my mapping looks like:

HasOptional(rfi => rfi.Project)
    .WithOptionalDependent()
    .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);

This mapping was creating 2 IDs in the database. Once I removed the mapping everything was working. I just need to figure out the correct mapping so I can remove the CascadeOnDelete, make the property optional, and only have one ID.

I figured if out with the Help of EF Power Tools. You can reverse engineer your DB into POCOs. I changed the above line to:

HasOptional(r => r.Project)
    .WithMany()
    .HasForeignKey(r => r.ProjectId)
    .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);

Even with a fluent interface mappings are a bit difficult to master. To understand how relationships are mapped in EF I created a simple database with my tables and foreign key assignments. I then used the Power Tools’ option for reverse engineering code first. Brilliant!

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