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Can I avoid the copying of object in the following way?

MyClass Obj;

try {
    throw &Obj;
}
catch(MyClass *a) {

}
share|improve this question
1  
Object copying is nothing compared to overhead associated with throwing an exception, and catching it. And amount of generated code to do so... So don't worry about it. If you feel like throwing non-copyable, or extremely expensive to copy object - you should not use it as an exception object at all. –  user405725 May 26 '11 at 19:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If the object is too expensive to copy, it should not be thrown as an exception - full stop. Exception classes should be fairly simple and light-weight. And you should always catch exceptions by reference (probably by const reference) - catching pointers is bad style. So your code should better be written:

try {
    throw MyClass();
}
catch( const MyClass & a) {
}

In response to your comment, this:

struct A {
    A() {}
    private:
    A( const A & ) {}
};

int main() {
    throw A();
}

should be an error. But you simply should not be prohibiting copying of classes you want to throw as exceptions - why are you doing this?

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Isn't it possible that you'd want to throw some context about the exception, such as what caused it or data required to back out of a transaction for example? That might cause the exception object to be not so light-weight. –  Mark Ransom May 26 '11 at 20:11
    
@Mark Some context, sure - my exception class contains a message, file name and line number. Data needed to back out a transaction - no. The transaction backout may be done in response to an exception, but the backout data should be stored elsewhere, like in a transaction log. Apart from anything else, you might want to backout a transaction in non-exceptional circumstances. –  nbt May 26 '11 at 20:14
    
In this example, Would the compiler use its own special copy-constructor? I have it in private section but I can still compile it. –  user768541 May 26 '11 at 20:45
    
@user Post the code. –  nbt May 26 '11 at 20:47
1  
@user Gah! But why don't you want it to be copied???????? And no, you should not change your compiler (at least WRT this issue), you should change your design. –  nbt May 26 '11 at 21:17

Don't do it.

Consider this program:

#include <iostream>
#define X() (std::cout << __FUNCTION__ << "\n")

struct MyClass {
 MyClass() { X(); }
 ~MyClass() { X(); }
};

void f() {
 MyClass Obj;
 throw &Obj;
}

int main() {
 try {
  f();
 } catch(MyClass *a) {
  X();
 }
}

the output of which is this:

MyClass
~MyClass
main

Notice that the pointed-to object is destroyed before the program entered the catch block. This means that we must not dereference a in the catch block, severely limiting its usefulness.

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In this case, using throw new MyClass() could make it work. –  cpx May 26 '11 at 20:17

It is syntactically correct and avoids the copy since the reference is being passed. But, usually an standard nameless exception object is constructed and is caught by the catch statement.

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The only way to avoid copying an exception object is to throw a pointer to the object, as you have done in your example. You must make sure that the object is static or heap allocated, not a local object that will disappear after leaving the code block during the throw.

Edit: Another approach comes to mind. You can create your own exception class (which should be derived from std::exception or one of its children) with the pointer as a member, then throw that. If you use a smart pointer such as shared_ptr you won't have to worry about the lifetime of the contained object.

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3  
But don't do that. –  nbt May 26 '11 at 19:53
    
However if Obj is declared in the same function as the throw then what happens is undefined or worse as the Obj is out of scope when you catch it –  Mark May 26 '11 at 19:54
    
@Neil, I wouldn't say it's a great idea - but Microsoft's MFC gets away with it. –  Mark Ransom May 26 '11 at 19:55
1  
More Effective C++ has a good overview of why throwing and catching pointers is A Bad Idea - it's Item 13 in the first ed. –  nbt May 26 '11 at 20:11
1  
@Mark This isn't really a lifetime issue. Please don't encourage newbies into flights of fantasy about throwing shared pointers. The correct way to use exceptions in C++ is to throw a value and catch a const reference. And yes, I do know that pointers are values, before the nitpickers start. –  nbt May 26 '11 at 20:22

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