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at first, please excuse my bad knowledge in english.

I've got the following Problem: I must find the shortest way between more then 2 Points in a fix order (e.g. A -> D -> F). I am familiar with the algorithm of Dijkstra. But that one does only compute the shortest ways between two Points. And I've also heard of the TSP, but that does not seem to fit, too. Because there is no fix order. I have searched the web for my Problem already, but maybe this is not an very popular one, or I've used the wrong key words.

Still, there must exists a solution, because there are many route planner, which successfuly provide this function.

So please, can anyone help me with my Problem by naming an aglorithm, or give me some advice.

thank you very much, for your help! yours sincerely, Angelo

//edit Oh, it is very embarrasing. It seems that I have thought to long, so I failed to describe the real issue. Its like that: There are some Tickets, that can only be used from begin.

T1: A -> B (costs 50) T2: B -> C (costs 50) T3: A -> B -> C (costs 80) The given route is A -> B -> C

Now you see, if we treat the given route as two separated Problems we will become a total cost of 100, but obviously the Ticket T3 is the better solution.

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So just to be clear, do you always know the intermediate hops? Your first example was A->D->F. Is there some reason why you would schedule a route A->B->D->F? –  Seth Robertson May 26 '11 at 20:44
    
yes, there is a given route like the example A -> D -> F, but the graph that results from the given tickets is greater. There may be no direct Edge between A and D. Or if there is one, maybe a route A -> B -> D costs less then the direct way. –  Angelo May 26 '11 at 20:53
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2 Answers

If some of the points are fixed but others are not (meaning the user wants to go from A->D->F, but the graph means they might have to do A->B->C->D->E->F) this a standard problem. Either you care about the order ADF or you don't (it might be AFD). In the first case, it is simple two paths (A->D D->F) which you compute independently. In the second case, it is more like TSP.

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Thanks for your quick help, but I described my Problem wrong. See my edit in the post above. Sorry for that. –  Angelo May 26 '11 at 20:38
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You can find the shortest path between A and D, then the shortest path between D and F etc. Applying Dijkstra algorithm multiple times for each pair of nodes.

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Thanks for your quick help, but I described my Problem wrong. See my edit in the post above. Sorry for that. –  Angelo May 26 '11 at 20:38
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