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I was talking with a person about using() statement.

He said if we do NOT use using() statement for something like a StreamWriter, if any exception happens, the resource will NEVER get collected.

I do understand to use using() statement, but I don't agree that the resource will never be collected. I think using() statement will call dispose() method at the end, which can make the collection much faster. However, even if we don't use using(), we don't call dispose(), the resource can still be collected by gabage collection, although it may take much longer time.

Who do you agree with?

ps. I know what you all are saying. It's important to use using() statement. I just want to find out if the resource will definitely never get collected if we don't do it?

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1  
Who do you agree with? Neither :) It's possible to design a disposable component so Dispose() method is not called from c# destructor and unmanaged resources won't be released. On the other hand, you are right: MS suggest a pattern where you always call Dispose(bool) from 2 places: from Dispose() and from the destructor. Assuming StreamWriter follows this pattern, GC would trigger its unmanaged resources release. –  DK. May 26 '11 at 20:28
    
Similar: IDisposable, does it really matter –  Henk Holterman May 26 '11 at 21:57
    
Long story short: you are correct. –  Hans Passant May 27 '11 at 14:56

7 Answers 7

Let's be clear on this. Suppose the resource in question is a file handle. The garbage collector knows nothing about the file handle or how to free it. The file handle is just an integer.

If the StreamWriter that is holding on to the file handle gets garbage collected then the garbage collector will put the object onto the finalization queue. When the finalization queue runs, it will call the finalizer of the object, and that is what releases the file handle.

Is that all clear? The garbage collector does not free the resource; the only resource the garbage collector knows about is objects in memory. Before the object is freed it is finalized, so it is the object itself that knows how to free the resource.

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using(x) is a deterministic pattern. It ensures that Dispose() is called on the implementor when a particular point in the execution flow is passed. The GC on the other hand is not deterministic, because you don't know exactly when the object will be actually disposed. using ensures that the object will execute its cleanup code (whatever that is) when you expect it to, rather than some time in the future.

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Exactly. And the consequence of not deterministically disposing a StreamWriter is that the underlying file handle stays open until it gets garbage collected. Produces great bugs, if you have time to spare. –  user180326 May 26 '11 at 20:32

If there's no reference to that StreamWriter anymore it will eventually be garbage collected, but it depends on the Garbage Collector when that is - it's not deterministic, so you should always use using blocks when you can.

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You should always call Dispose() when you are done using an IDisposable object. A using statement is a great tool for making sure you obide by this rule.

The purpose of IDisposable is to allow classes to dispose of allocated unmanaged resources which will not be automatically cleaned up by garbage collection.

If you use an IDisposable object without calling Dispose() when you are done, you run the risk of never disposing of the resource properly, even after it has been garbage collected.

This is the reason why the using statement exists; it provides a convenient syntax for using IDisposable objects and defines a clear scope in which these objects are usable.

Note also that the garbage collector never calls Dispose() itself, but note also that it is recommended to follow the Finalize/Dispose pattern as documented on MSDN. If an object follows the Finalize/Dispose pattern, Dispose() will be called when the GC calls the finalizer.

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Yes, but the GC calls Dispose() on the objects it collects. So the unmanaged resources will be collected eventually, except in a handful of unusual edge cases. –  JSBձոգչ May 26 '11 at 20:19
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No, the GC does not call Dispose(). Implementors are advised to follow the Finalize/Dispose pattern where the finalizer calls Dispose(false). There is no guarantee that the implementation actually does this, though. –  Håvard S May 26 '11 at 20:21
    
It won't, unless you're calling Dispose in the finalizer. And finalizers aren't reliably called when an object is collected. –  Kevin Hsu May 26 '11 at 20:22
    
@Kevin, finalizers are reliably called when an object is collected. What would be the point of them if they sometimes wouldn't run? That being said, you don't know when is it going to be called. It's possible that finalizers of some of your objects are going to be called only when you shut the program down. –  svick May 27 '11 at 7:37
    
@svick, that was mostly my point. When an object is collected, you can't rely on the finalizer being called in a timely fashion. Furthermore, you can't rely on it ever getting called since the process may terminate unexpectedly. If that leaves external resources locked, you are hosed. –  Kevin Hsu May 27 '11 at 8:16

I was talking with a person about using() statement. He said if we do NOT use using() statement for something like a StreamWriter, if any exception happens, the resource will NEVER get collected.

The using statement has nothing to do with garbage collection. As soon as an object has no live references it becomes eligible for garbage collection.

I do understand to use using() statement, but I don't agree that the resource will never be collected.

Oh, then you're right.

I think using() statement will call dispose() method at the end, which can make the collection much faster.

It may or may not make the collection faster. It is typical for a dispose method to call GC.SupressFinalize(object), which means that the finalizer will not be called when the object is garbage collected. Instead, the object will simply be collected. So this could make the collection faster.

If you intend to say that it causes the object to be collected immediately rather than later, then that would be incorrect. Eligible objects are collected whenever the garbage collector gets around to it, never before, and an object become eligible as soon as it has no live references, which the using statement has little effect on. Actually, since the finally block of the using statement contains a live reference, I can imagine scenerios in which it might increase the lifetime of the object, but this effect is not a consideration, since controlling an object's lifetime is not the point of a using. Deterministic disposal of unmanaged resources is the point of a using statement.

However, even if we don't use using(), we don't call dispose(), the resource can still be collected by gabage collection, although it may take much longer time.

Again, using and Dispose do not typically effect the lifetime of an object. It only affects the state of unmanaged resources (assuming the Dispose method is implemented correctly). You are correct that the object will still be collected.

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using is essentially the same as the following (Check the IL of both if you doubt it):

 try
 { 
      IDisposable o = new Object();
 }
 finally
 {
      o.Dispose();
 }

As long as the object in question implements IDisposable, the Dispose() method will be called and the resource, pending something stupid coded in Dispose() will be Garbage Collected. When? Not a question I can answer.

Is it possible that an item will never be GCed. Well, never is a long time, but theoretically possible if it gets beyond the first generation and just sits there. A problem? No, if the memory is eventually needed, it will be cleaned. Often seen, incorrectly, as a memory leak? Most certainly.

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If it were possible to, I would upvote this answer twice :-) An excellent explanation of an all too common misconception. –  DaveRead May 26 '11 at 20:21
2  
Just one nit-picky detail: the variable o must be declared outside the try block or else it will not be visible from inside the finally block. –  KeithS May 26 '11 at 20:22
1  
Also, the generated code from the compiler will do a null check on o before it calls Dispose. –  vcsjones May 26 '11 at 20:25
1  
This answer is wrong; the GC does not call Dispose() for you. –  Håvard S May 26 '11 at 20:25
    
@Hâvard. It depends. If the object has unmanaged resources and the IDisposable pattern is correctly implemented then the GC will call indirectly Dispose() for you. If there is no unmanaged resources then you are right, the GC will not call Dispose but that is not really an issue as it will all be managed resources which will eventually get collected one way or another once there are no valid references to the object. –  InBetween May 26 '11 at 20:33

If a StreamWriter is created with a Stream that will be used by other code even after the StreamWriter has been abandoned, one must not call Dispose on the StreamWriter. If the stream will be abandoned by its owner after being given to a StreamWriter, then for correctness one must call Dispose on the StreamWriter.

In retrospect, StreamWriter should probably have had a do-nothing IDisposable implementation, but had an descendant class StreamOwningWriter whose implementation would dispose the passed-in stream. Alternatively, it could have had a constructor parameter and property to indicate whether it should dispose the stream when its own Dispose method is called. Had either of these approaches been taken, then the correct behavior would always have been to call Dispose on a StreamWriter (and let the "StreamWriter" (which could be either a StreamWriter or a StreamOwningWriter) worry about whether the Dispose should actually do anything).

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