Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

UPDATE Following @Ryan Olds suggestion to include the setTimeout in the callback, I must clarify that in my production code I'm calling multiple urls to get json data from several sites. (Have updated JavaScript code below).

Is it only possible to have multiple timeouts scattered throughout this function?


I have a self-invoking updateFunction as follows:

(function update() {
  $.ajax({
    type: 'GET',
    url: "http://myexample.com/jsondata",
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function (data) {
      // do some callback stuff
    },
    async: false
  });

 $.ajax({
    type: 'GET',
    url: "http://myexample2.com/jsondata2",
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function (data) {
      // do some further callback stuff
    },
    async: false
  });

  setTimeout(update, 2000);
})();

What I expected this code to do

I hoped that this function would go off to the target URL and wait for the result, then deal with the success callback. Then (and only then) would it fall through to set a 2 second timeout to call the function again.

What appears to be happening instead

Instead, the GET request codes out, and before the response has been dealt with, the timeout has already been set.

What am I missing? How can I make this entirely synchronous?

share|improve this question
    
You could put setTimeout inside of the success callback for the AJAX call, is one suggestion. You could also use setInterval instead of setTimeout and call it after the main declaration. –  g.d.d.c May 26 '11 at 21:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If I were you, I'd make use of jQuery's support for deferred action.

(function update() {
    $.when($.ajax({
        type: 'GET',
        url: "http://myexample.com/jsondata",
        dataType: 'json',
        success: function (data) {
            // do some callback stuff
        }
    }), $.ajax({
        type: 'GET',
        url: "http://myexample2.com/jsondata2",
        dataType: 'json',
        success: function (data) {
            // do some further callback stuff
        }
    }), $.ajax({
        // more requests as you like
    })).then(function() {
        // when all the requests are complete
        setTimeout(update, 2000);
    });
}());

Much nicer, IMHO, than mucking around with synchronous requests. Indeed, if the requests are cross-domain, this is pretty much your only option.

See

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic, didn't even realise that existed in 1.5 - thanks –  isNaN1247 May 27 '11 at 6:52

Move the timeout in to the success callback. The request is synchronous, it would appear the the callback is not.

share|improve this answer
    
@Ryan - just updated my question as didn't really clarify enough. Is it only possible to have multiple timeouts scattered throughout this function? –  isNaN1247 May 26 '11 at 21:48
    
Do the requests need to happen in a specific sequence? –  Ryan Olds May 26 '11 at 22:00
    
Ideally they would, although in practice it wouldn't be a problem if they all came back at different times - as long as the loop doesn't being again until they have all returned –  isNaN1247 May 26 '11 at 22:05
3  
No, I don't think the requests are synchronous. They're cross-domain requests, which means that jQuery is going to use JSONP, and that's always asynchronous. –  Pointy May 26 '11 at 22:10
    
You will need to implement a counter in update() that is incremented and checked in each of the callbacks. Only after both callbacks have complete is the next setTimeout called. If you don't you would be creating a race condition. –  Ryan Olds May 26 '11 at 22:17

I would modify the setup like so:

function update() {
  $.ajax({
    type: 'GET',
    url: "http://myexample.com/jsondata",
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function (data) {
      // do some callback stuff
    },
    async: false
  });

 $.ajax({
    type: 'GET',
    url: "http://myexample2.com/jsondata2",
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function (data) {
      // do some further callback stuff
    },
    async: false
  });
}

setInterval(update, 2000);

update(); // only necessary if you can't wait 2 seconds before 1st load.
share|improve this answer
    
I would need to check, but I don't know if setInterval/setTimeout pause during synchronous requests. What if the requests take longer then 2 seconds? You're inviting a backlog. –  Ryan Olds May 26 '11 at 22:11

You cannot make it entirely synchronous because you're setting up calls to alternate domains. That's done (internal to jQuery) by creating <script> tags and adding them to the document. Browsers perform those calls asynchronously, and that's that. You can't make ordinary xhr requests to domains different from your own.

I can't imagine why you'd want something like that to be synchronous, especially since you're doing many of these operations.

share|improve this answer
    
Just to clarify, as mentioned to @Ryan Olds - it wouldn't be a problem if they all came back at different times - as long as the loop doesn't being again until they have all returned. I thought that making the requests synchronous would be the best way forward based on that requirement. –  isNaN1247 May 27 '11 at 6:47
    
@beardtwizzle there are better ways to do that now, as @lonesomeday describes in his answer :-) –  Pointy May 27 '11 at 11:31

I don't think async: false works on cross domain requests.

From the docs: async Boolean Default: true By default, all requests are sent asynchronously (i.e. this is set to true by default). If you need synchronous requests, set this option to false. Cross-domain requests and dataType: "jsonp" requests do not support synchronous operation. Note that synchronous requests may temporarily lock the browser, disabling any actions while the request is active.

In any case, maybe you can set some conditionals to fire the requests in the order that you want.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.