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I am trying to get my head round a complex mysql statement (complex to me anyway!). Basically, I need to return a list of all products from within the products table with an extra return value (their respective star rating (rating table) which must be calculated on an average of the total of all ratings for that product).

The sql statement must also include the ability to filter the products based upon multiple 'tag' words , e.g search for all products that are linked (through product_tags table to the tags table) to words specified when constructing the sql statement. So, if I needed to retrieve products that have the tags 'red' and 'white', the results would return products 1 and 3 with their respective average rating.

Below is a sql dump of the sample tables.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `product_tags`;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `rating`;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `tags`;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `products`;
CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `products` (
  `product_id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `product_name` varchar(255) CHARACTER SET latin1 NOT NULL,
  `date_added` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  PRIMARY KEY (`product_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=4 ;

INSERT INTO `products` (`product_id`, `product_name`, `date_added`) VALUES
(1, 'first item', '2011-05-26 21:56:06'),
(2, 'second item', '2011-05-26 21:56:06'),
(3, 'third item', '2011-05-26 21:56:06');


CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `product_tags` (
  `product_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `tag_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  KEY `product_id` (`product_id`),
  KEY `tag_id` (`tag_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

INSERT INTO `product_tags` (`product_id`, `tag_id`) VALUES
(1, 4),
(1, 1),
(1, 8),
(2, 3),
(2, 9),
(3, 8),
(3, 7),
(1, 6),
(2, 5),
(3, 2),
(3, 10);

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `rating` (
  `product_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `rating` float NOT NULL,
  KEY `product_id` (`product_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

INSERT INTO `rating` (`product_id`, `rating`) VALUES
(1, 5),
(1, 0),
(2, 3),
(2, 4.5),
(1, 2),
(2, 4);

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `tags` (
  `tag_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `tag_name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`tag_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=11 ;

INSERT INTO `tags` (`tag_id`, `tag_name`) VALUES
(1, 'red'),
(2, 'green'),
(3, 'yellow'),
(4, 'cyan'),
(5, 'blue'),
(6, 'pink'),
(7, 'purple'),
(8, 'grey'),
(9, 'black'),
(10, 'white');

ALTER TABLE `product_tags`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `product_tags_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`tag_id`) REFERENCES `product_tags` (`tag_id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  ADD CONSTRAINT `product_tags_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`product_id`) REFERENCES `product_tags` (`product_id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE;

ALTER TABLE `rating`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `rating_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`product_id`) REFERENCES `products` (`product_id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE;
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT  
    p.product_id
  , p.product_name
  , p.date_added
  , ( SELECT AVG(r.rating) 
      FROM rating r
      WHERE r.product_id = p.product_id
    )
    AS avg_rating 
FROM
  products p
    JOIN
  product_tags pt
      ON pt.product_id = p.product_id
    JOIN
  tags t
      ON t.tag_id = pt.tag_id
WHERE
    t.tag_name IN ('red','white')
GROUP BY
    p.product_id

As a side note, it's better to use singular for table names. product, tag, product_tag (like rating which is already singular) and not plural as you do: products, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
is the ratings subquery better than a left join? –  manji May 26 '11 at 22:20
    
Probably the same. The query plan would show. Main difference is that if there are products with many tags, (say both red and white) and multiple ratings, (say 3, 5, 8, 12), a LEFT JOIN would calculate the average of (3,5,8,12,3,5,8,12) which is 56/8 = 7 where the subquery would calculate the average of (3,5,8,12) which is off course the same in the end: 28/4 = 7. It may be faster this way (with big tables). –  ypercube May 26 '11 at 22:28
SELECT `products`.`product_id`, `product_name`, `date_added`,
       AVG(`rating`) avg_rating,
       GROUP_CONCAT(`tags`.`tag_name`) all_tags
  FROM `products`
  JOIN `product_tags` ON `products`.`product_id` = `product_tags`.`product_id`
  JOIN `tags` ON `product_tags`.`tag_id` = `tags`.`tag_id`
  LEFT JOIN `rating` ON `products`.`product_id` = `rating`.`product_id`
 WHERE `tags`.`tag_name` in (?)
 GROUP BY `products`.`product_id`
share|improve this answer
    
paul the group by product.product_id is really all that counts, because the product_id is the primary key and MySQL does not need to have all the selected (non aggregate) fields listed in the group by clause. (Most) other SQL servers do however. –  Johan May 26 '11 at 22:07
    
It returns #1052 - Column 'product_id' in field list is ambiguous –  Paul May 26 '11 at 22:10
    
The only LEFT JOIN needed is with table rating. The other two joins can be INNER JOINs because of the WHERE tags.tag_name IN ? condition. –  ypercube May 26 '11 at 22:13
    
@Paul: Use SELECT products.product_id, ... –  ypercube May 26 '11 at 22:13
select 
  p.product_id
  , p.product_name
  , group_concat(distinct tag_name) as tags
  , ifnull(avg(r.rating),'no rating') as avg_rating 
from products p
left join rating r on (r.product_id = p.product_id)
inner join product_tags pt on (pt.product_id = p.product_id)
inner join tags t on (t.tag_id = pt.tag_id)
where tag_name in ('red','white')
group by p.product_id

Result:

1, 'first item', 'red', '2.33333333333333'
3, 'third item', 'white', 'no rating'
share|improve this answer
    
The results don't seem to return item 3, which has the 'white' tag –  Paul May 26 '11 at 22:08
    
@Paul, that's because item 3 does not have a rating, fixed the query to also include items with no rating. –  Johan May 26 '11 at 22:19

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