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Is there any popular database that lets you store JSON-like documents without the need of running a server? Something similar to SQLite but for JSON documents?

Actually i may have provided somewhat vague description. I would like to store an undefined number and hierarchy of custom propertties (that's why i am thinking of JSON) concerning properties of various java classes and fields, and read them in a Java Web application. Something like Java annotations but using a database, so i could edit them without changing the java code.

For example: every domain class/field and service class/method would have multiple custom properties assigned to it. It would be even better if the whole database could be red on application startup, but i still want to be able to query the data in a manner that i choose for example: give me all properties of field "name" of class "User". I would not like to have another database server for that purpose. A database which would perfectly fit my needs is mongodb but it requires a dedicated server process. A simple database file that would be red on application startup and an engine that would allow for querying the structure, just like mongodb uses, would be perfect.

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Anything specific you need that would rule out just storing JSON in an SQLite database? –  onteria_ May 26 '11 at 22:16
    
What exactly do you mean by 'server'? Is a local process ok for you? If not, that raises next question: what language? There are various serializers for JSON and then you could put the data into an SQLite database that has just one table. –  mkro May 26 '11 at 22:19
    
i have edited the description to provide more info. Thank you for your input. –  Pma May 26 '11 at 22:25
    
I am considering creating the index files as json docs that contain hrefs to new files to create pages of data that would be read by the client and interpreted. –  h4ck3rm1k3 May 5 '12 at 15:14

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