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My tests indicate that the following code is not thread safe even though the class is stateless and all state shared between methods is passed as parameters from method to method. A single instance of the following class is being invoked by multiple threads.

public class ThingFinder {

    Token findFoo(TokenIterator<? extends Token> iterator, 
                  Token start, final Token limit) {

        Token partOfFoo = searchForward(iterator, start, new TokenSearcher() {
            int maxTokens = 5;

            @Override
            public SearchAction assessToken(Token aToken) {
                if (limit != null && (aToken.getStart() >= limit.getStart())) {
                    return SearchAction.STOP;
                }
                if (maxTokens-- == 0) {
                    return SearchAction.STOP;
                }
                if (isAThing(aToken)) {
                    return SearchAction.MATCH;
                } else {
                    return SearchAction.IGNORE;
                }
            }
        });
        return partOfFoo;
    }

    public Token extractAThing(TokenIterator<? extends Token> iterator) {
        Token start = findStart(iterator);
        Token limit = findLimit(iterator, start);

        return findFoo(iterator, start, limit);
    }
}

The intent was for this class to be thread safe due to the fact that is is stateless and all state that needs to be shared among methods is passed from method to method as parameters. However, the tests indicate that sometimes we get a null pointer exception at this line:

     if (limit != null && (aToken.getStart() >= limit.getStart())) {

It seems that sometime between the null value check and the invocation of getStart the parameter limit is becoming null.

Note that the method findFoo declares the limit parameter to be final:

    Token findFoo(TokenIterator<? extends Token> iterator, Token start, 
                  final Token limit) {

Is it the case that final method parameters are not on the stack frame but instead one instance is shared among all invocations of the method? If it is true that there is one instance shared among all invocations then does this imply that using final parameters makes a class inherently thread Unsafe?

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1  
Are you sure that limit is null? If aToken is null, you'd get the same exception. –  MikeTheReader May 26 '11 at 22:42
1  
How sure are you that limit is the culprit, and not aToken? –  Kevin K May 26 '11 at 22:43
    
aToken is guaranteed to not be null. It is clear from the framework that performs the call backs but is hard to show in a posting. In addition I have added null pointer checks for aToken during testing. –  ditkin May 26 '11 at 22:45
2  
What is return type for getStart()? Is it primitive? –  Alex Gitelman May 26 '11 at 23:00
    
Is Token an immutable class? If not and you share instances of Token between your threads this will not be thread safe –  jontro May 26 '11 at 23:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is it the case that final method parameters are not on the stack frame but instead one instance is shared among all invocations of the method? If it is true that there is one instance shared among all invocations then does this imply that using final parameters makes a class inherently thread Unsafe?

No, I think you are mixing something here.

What the final modifier here does is allowing the local variable limit to be copied into a synthetic variable of the anonymous TokenSearcher instance. This copying occurs during the construction of this instance, and then it will be used by the assessToken method. This synthetic variable will still be final (or at least not modified), thus there should be no problem here if your framework does not do reflection magic (and this in parallel, still).

Still each call of findFoo will have its own parameters.

As said by Reed, the unboxing of the getStart result is a more probable culprit.

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getStart returns an int. I have read about the "method area" in the jvm and its relationship to final variables. Can the anonymous inner class live past the method invocation? If so what Limit variable will it access? –  ditkin May 27 '11 at 0:14
    
I understand your explanation. If limit is final then it can be copied, which is why it must be final to be used by an anonymous inner class. Nice explanation and I will take this as an answer since it frees me from being concerned about how the anonymous inner class is accessing the final parameter limit –  ditkin May 27 '11 at 2:00
    
Yes, these method-local classes (including anonymous ones) are a very limited version of Closures, they work only on final variables, since these will not ever change, thus bypassing the problem. –  Paŭlo Ebermann May 27 '11 at 9:04

It seems that sometime between the null value check and the invocation of getStart the parameter limit is becoming null.

That is not possible. At the point you are testing and using limit it is (effectively) a private final instance variable of a thread-confined object. The fact that it is final means that it won't change. If it is non-null to start with, it will stay that way. The fact that the object is thread confined means that no other thread apart from the current one can get to it anyway.

(The only potential thread safety issue I can think of might arise if your searchForward method passed the TokenSearcher object off to a different thread; i.e. the object was not thread-confined. Might that be happening?)

I think that the real problem is something else:

  • The aStart parameter could be null.
  • If one or other of the getStart() methods is declared to return a boxed type, they might be returning null.

Either of these could result in an NPE in that line.


Can the anonymous inner class live past the method invocation?

It could do. It entirely depends on what the searchForward method call does.

If so what Limit variable will it access?

The code of the anonymous inner class accesses a copy of limit held as an instance variable of the TokenSearcher object. It is initialized when the object is created, and is final.

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getStart returns an int. I have read about the "method area" in the jvm and its relationship to final variables. Can the anonymous inner class live past the method invocation? If so what Limit variable will it access? – ditkin 5 mins ago add comment –  ditkin May 27 '11 at 0:26

In regards to your question in general, each method invocation does get its own instance of the final parameter. Final does not create a static variable. It simply allows the variable to be set only once.

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The same exception may also be produced if getStart() is returning a Long or Integer type, but the value is null. The exception is caused by un-boxing to integer or long for the >= comparison, but the native types cannot be null.

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getStart() returns an int. –  ditkin May 26 '11 at 23:23
    
Given that you've added enough responses here to eliminate the usual suspects, I would proceed by placing the result of the two getLimit calls into local variables (protected of course by null checks, despite the guarantees of the framework), thus the NPE would occur on a line with no other operations and pinpoint the culprit. If still scratching you head after than, mark getStart as synchronized and see what happens. –  Reed May 26 '11 at 23:59
    
Beyond my expertise... Perhaps Jeremy Manson link can shed some light. He worked on JSR 133, the Java memory model. –  Reed May 27 '11 at 0:52

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