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I am working on a project using an Arduino that needs to calculate the area of a polygon made up of many points. I use surveyor's theorem,

But the points are in random order, not (counter)clockwise. Some make lines that cross, and they make polygons like a bow-tie or hourglass, which don't work for the surveyor's theorem, so I need to sort them in (counter)clockwise order. what is the easiest way to do this?

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3  
"but all of the algorithms that i have seen that can calculate it rely on vector functions, and since this will be the only function using them it seems pointless to have them" - that logic is flawed. –  Mitch Wheat May 27 '11 at 1:25
    
Translating from vector to scalar is trivial but cumbersome. Translating from scalar to vector is neither of them. –  belisarius May 27 '11 at 1:31
    
@Mitch Wheat not pointless, but wastefull, is better. –  invisible bob May 27 '11 at 17:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could find the center of gravity (cx,cy) of the points and then calculate the angles of the points relative to (cx,cy).

angle[i] = atan2(y[i]-cy, x[i]-cx) ; 

Then sort the points by angle.

Just beware that a random set of points does not describe a single unique polygon. So this method will just give you one of the possible polygons, and not necessarily the polygon you would have obtained if you had manually connected the dots.

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You don't need to find the convex hull. Just use the area formula from a bunch of points ordered counterclockwise:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polygon#Area_and_centroid

float totalArea = 0.0;
for(i=0; i<N; i++) {
    float parallelogramArea = (point[i].x*point[i+1].y - point[i+1].x*point[i].y)
    float triangleArea = parallelogramArea / 2.0;
    totalArea += triangleArea;
}
// or divide by 2 out here for efficiency

The area formula comes from taking each edge AB, and calculating the (signed) area between the edge and the origin (triangle ABO) by taking the cross-product (which gives you the area of a parallelogram) and cutting it in half (factor of 1/2). As one wraps around the polygon, these positive and negative triangles will overlap, and the area between the origin and the polygon will be cancelled out and sum to 0, while only the area inside remains. This is why the formula is called the Surveyor's Formula, since the "surveyor" is at the origin; if going counterclockwise, positive area is added when going left->right and negative area is added when going right->left, from the perspective of the origin.

The mathematical formula is given below, but does not provide the intuition behind it (as given above):

edit (after question has been changed)

There is absolutely no way to "get their order" without additional assumptions, e.g. "the polygon is convex".

  • If the polygon is concave, it becomes nearly impossible in the general case without lots of extra assumptions (proof: consider a point which lies within the convex hull, but whose neighbors do not; there are many possible valid polygons you can construct using that point, its neighbors, and their neighbors).

  • If the polygon is convex, all you need to do is sort by the angle from some arbitrary point inside the polygon (e.g. centroid of three arbitrary points).

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I have just updated Wikipedia with my derivation/explanation. –  ninjagecko May 27 '11 at 2:08
    
That is the current formula i use, but my poinst are not in counterclockwise order, and some of them make crossed polygons like a bowtie, which doesn't wrok with the surveyor's formula, i will restate the question more clearly. –  invisible bob May 27 '11 at 17:17
    
@invisible bob: there is absolutely no way to "get their order" without additional assumptions, such as that the polygon is convex. If the polygon is concave, it becomes nearly impossible in the general case without lots of extra assumptions (proof: consider a point which lies within the convex hull, but whose neighbors do not; there are many possible valid polygons you can construct using that point, its neighbors, and their neighbors). If the polygon is convex, all you need to do is calculate the angle from some arbitrary point inside the polygon (e.g. centroid of three arbitrary points). –  ninjagecko Jun 2 '11 at 22:28

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