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I can't really think of any reason why python needs the del keyword (and most languages seem to not have a similar keyword). For instance, rather than deleting a variable, one could just assign None to it. And when deleting from a dictionary, a del method could be added.

Is there any reason to keep del in python, or is it a vestige of Python's pre-garbage collection days?

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9  
Historical note: Python had garbage collection from the beginning. Prior to 2.0, Python's garbage collector could not detect cycles of references, but that had nothing to do with del. –  Steven Rumbalski May 27 '11 at 2:05
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@Steven Rumbalksi, it does have something to do with del. Del was used to break reference cycles. –  Winston Ewert May 27 '11 at 3:24
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@Winston Ewert Upon further googling, I agree with you on that point. –  Steven Rumbalski May 27 '11 at 3:50
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but del isn't a vestigate of pre-garbage collection because you could always have used = None. It's just always made sense to have specific syntax for it. Since we have cylical GC now, the cases where you want to use either is small. –  Winston Ewert May 27 '11 at 4:01
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10 Answers

up vote 78 down vote accepted

Firstly, you can del other things besides local variables

del list_item[4]
del dictionary["alpha"]

Both of which should be clearly useful. Secondly, using del on a local variable makes the intent clearer.

   del foo
   foo = None

I know in the case of del foo that the intent is to remove the variable from scope. Its not clear that foo = None is doing that. If somebody just assigned foo = None I might think it was dead code. But I instantly know what somebody who codes del foo was trying to do.

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+1, yes. When you assign something, it conveys an intent to use it later. I've only really seen del used in memory-intensive calculations, but when I saw it I realised immediately why it was necessary. –  detly May 27 '11 at 2:07
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The use-case of deleting from a list or dictionary could easily be replaced with a method (as I noted in the question). I'm not sure I agree with the use of del to signal intent (as a comment could do the same without adding to the language), but I suppose that's the best answer. –  Jason Baker Dec 14 '12 at 17:59
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@JasonBaker, granted on the methods. Deleting slices and such would more awkward using a method though. Yes, you could use a comment. But I think using a statement is better then a comment as its part of the language. –  Winston Ewert Dec 15 '12 at 15:19
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There's this part of what del does (from the Python Language Reference):

Deletion of a name removes the binding of that name from the local or global namespace

Assigning None to a name does not remove the binding of the name from the namespace.

(I suppose there could be some debate about whether removing a name binding is actually useful, but that's another question.)

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-1 The poster clearly already understands this, he's asking why you want would to remove a name binding. –  Winston Ewert May 27 '11 at 1:59
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@Winston Ewert: I'm not sure the poster understood that del removes a name binding as he suggested assigning None as an alternative. –  Steven Rumbalski May 27 '11 at 2:22
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@Steven, the poster clearly contrasts deleting the variable (removing the name) and assigning None. He doesn't see why you should delete the variable when you can just assign None. The have the same effect in that they release the reference to whatever was previously bound to that name. –  Winston Ewert May 27 '11 at 3:25
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@Winston Ewert: It's not clear to me. Perhaps it's clear to you in that you state that they "have the same effect in that the release the reference to whatever was previously bound to that name." But that's (clearly?) not the whole story in that an attempt to use a name after deleting it raises a NameError. Greg Hewgill makes this very distinction. And it's this distinction that makes your assertion of what the poster "clearly" understood unclear to me. –  Steven Rumbalski May 27 '11 at 3:39
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@Winston Ewert I don't agree. But enough said. We've both made our cases. –  Steven Rumbalski May 27 '11 at 12:23
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Just another thinking.

When debugging http applications in framework like Django, the call stack full of useless and messed up variables previously used, especially when it's a very long list, could be very painful for developers. so, at this point, namespace controlling could be useful.

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When is del useful in python?

You can use it to remove a single element of an array instead of the slice syntax x[i:i+1]=[]. This may be useful if for example you are in os.walk and wish to delete an element in the directory. I would not consider a keyword useful for this though, since one could just make a [].remove(index) method (the .remove method is actually search-and-remove-first-instance-of-value).

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There is a specific example of when you should use del (there may be others, but I know about this one off hand) when you are using sys.exc_info() to inspect an exception. This function returns a tuple, the type of exception that was raised, the message, and a traceback.

The first two values are usually sufficient to diagnose an error and act on it, but the third contains the entire call stack between where the exception was raised and where the the exception is caught. In particular, if you do something like

try:
    do_evil()
except:
    exc_type, exc_value, tb = sys.exc_info()
    if something(exc_value):
        raise

the traceback, tb ends up in the locals of the call stack, creating a circular reference that cannot be garbage collected. Thus, it is important to do:

try:
    do_evil()
except:
    exc_type, exc_value, tb = sys.exc_info()
    del tb
    if something(exc_value):
        raise

to break the circular reference. In many cases where you would want to call sys.exc_info(), like with metaclass magic, the traceback is useful, so you have to make sure that you clean it up before you can possibly leave the exception handler. If you don't need the traceback, you should delete it immediately, or just do:

exc_type, exc_value = sys.exc_info()[:2]

To avoid it all together.

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5  
Its no longer true that the garbage collector won't collect it. However, the cycle will delay collection. –  Winston Ewert May 27 '11 at 1:57
    
This isn't too relevant, and doesn't answer the op's question. –  Hugo Jun 29 '12 at 14:43
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I think one of the reasons that del has its own syntax is that replacing it with a function might be hard in certain cases given it operates on the binding or variable and not the value it references. Thus if a function version of del were to be created a context would need to be passed in. del foo would need to become globals().remove('foo') or locals().remove('foo') which gets messy and less readable. Still I say getting rid of del would be good given its seemingly rare use. But removing language features/flaws can be painful. Maybe python 4 will remove it :)

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You can use __del__() to log warnings\errors if the object is deleted in an unexpected internal state.

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2  
and what does this have to do with the question? –  Winston Ewert Oct 9 '11 at 19:21
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Once I had to use:

del serial
serial = None

because using only:

serial = None

didn't release the serial port fast enough to immediately open it again. From that lesson I learned that del really meant: "GC this NOW! and wait until it's done" and that is really useful in a lot of situations. Of course, you may have a system.gc.del_this_and_wait_balbalbalba(obj).

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Hmm... That really should not have made a difference. Although, perhaps your issue was fixed by the extra delay it introduced? –  Winston Ewert Nov 28 '12 at 22:09
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del is the equivalent of "unset" in many languages and as a cross reference point moving from another language to python.. people tend to look for commands that do the same thing that they used to do in their first language... also setting a var to "" or none doesn't really remove the var from scope..it just empties its value the name of the var itself would still be stored in memory...why?!? in a memory intensive script..keeping trash behind its just a no no and anyways...every language out there has some form of an "unset/delete" var function..why not python?

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2  
del does not invoke the garbage collector any more quickly than = None, nor will either leave garbage behind in the long run. You might want to bone up on Python's garbage collection. –  SilverbackNet Dec 18 '12 at 7:18
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Every object in python has an identifier, Type, reference count associated with it, when we use del the reference count is reduced, when the reference count becomes zero it is a potential candidate for getting garbage collected. This differentiates the del when compared to setting an identifier to None. In later case it simply means the object is just left out wild( until we are out of scope in which case the count is reduced) and simply now the identifier point to some other object(memory location).

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I would like to see proof of this. Assigning None should decrement the reference count. –  Jason Baker Jun 14 '13 at 16:43
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