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I'm using SQL Server 2008.

I'd like to create a backup (.bak file) of the database every day at midnight, and then store the file. Is there a way to do this?

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3  
I have to ask, did you even "TRY" to look for help. I.e a simple google search, or in SQL Management Studio hit f1 and look at backups? Seriously. –  Ryk May 27 '11 at 3:28
1  
This question is definitely has nothing to do with C# and asp.net tags. I'm removing these tags. –  Eriawan Kusumawardhono May 27 '11 at 3:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

create a maintenence plan to do the backup you require. You can also setup a job to run the backup TSQL yourself if you can't do a plan.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177266.aspx

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While providing links is helpful, a specific excerpt from the link completes your question in case the link goes dead and doesn't require the user to read through the entire documentation. –  Kermit Nov 18 '13 at 15:23
    
Why would you bother down voting and commenting on an answer that's 2.5 yrs old? –  DustinDavis Nov 22 '13 at 15:40
    
Probably because there is a better answer in this question. –  Kermit Nov 22 '13 at 15:49

Assuming you have a sql agent running, a database named KCSSUG, a user named billinkc on a box named angband7, you'd get a sql agent job named "BackupMyStuff" that runs daily at midnight. It has one step, named "Back that db up" which executes a TSQL statement of BACKUP DATABASE. Finally, it creates a schedule for this job and sets it run daily at midnight.

USE [msdb]
GO
DECLARE @jobId BINARY(16)
EXEC  msdb.dbo.sp_add_job @job_name=N'BackupMyStuff', 
        @enabled=1, 
        @notify_level_eventlog=0, 
        @notify_level_email=2, 
        @notify_level_netsend=2, 
        @notify_level_page=2, 
        @delete_level=0, 
        @category_name=N'[Uncategorized (Local)]', 
        @owner_login_name=N'angband7\billinkc', @job_id = @jobId OUTPUT
select @jobId
GO
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_add_jobserver @job_name=N'BackupMyStuff', @server_name = N'ANGBAND7'
GO
USE [msdb]
GO
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_add_jobstep @job_name=N'BackupMyStuff', @step_name=N'Back that db up', 
        @step_id=1, 
        @cmdexec_success_code=0, 
        @on_success_action=1, 
        @on_fail_action=2, 
        @retry_attempts=0, 
        @retry_interval=0, 
        @os_run_priority=0, @subsystem=N'TSQL', 
        @command=N'BACKUP DATABASE [KCSSUG] TO  DISK = N''C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10.MSSQLSERVER\MSSQL\Backup\KCSSUG.bak'' WITH NOFORMAT, NOINIT,  NAME = N''KCSSUG-Full Database Backup'', SKIP, NOREWIND, NOUNLOAD,  STATS = 10
', 
        @database_name=N'master', 
        @flags=0
GO
USE [msdb]
GO
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_update_job @job_name=N'BackupMyStuff', 
        @enabled=1, 
        @start_step_id=1, 
        @notify_level_eventlog=0, 
        @notify_level_email=2, 
        @notify_level_netsend=2, 
        @notify_level_page=2, 
        @delete_level=0, 
        @description=N'', 
        @category_name=N'[Uncategorized (Local)]', 
        @owner_login_name=N'angband7\billinkc', 
        @notify_email_operator_name=N'', 
        @notify_netsend_operator_name=N'', 
        @notify_page_operator_name=N''
GO
USE [msdb]
GO
DECLARE @schedule_id int
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_add_jobschedule @job_name=N'BackupMyStuff', @name=N'Daily_midnight', 
        @enabled=1, 
        @freq_type=4, 
        @freq_interval=1, 
        @freq_subday_type=1, 
        @freq_subday_interval=0, 
        @freq_relative_interval=0, 
        @freq_recurrence_factor=1, 
        @active_start_date=20110526, 
        @active_end_date=99991231, 
        @active_start_time=0, 
        @active_end_time=235959, @schedule_id = @schedule_id OUTPUT
select @schedule_id
GO

[edit]Also, since you have this tagged as C# and asp.net, if you want to use some other scheduler or call it on demand, you really only need to worry about the BACKUP DATABASE statement which you can hit from an ADO.NET ExecuteNonReader() call.

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1  
Downvoter, (hi @theoptimusprime) care to explain why this answer is deficient? –  billinkc Nov 18 '13 at 15:20
    
+1 Maintenance plans are a slippery slope; I'd rather have more control over potential bad practices that can be turned on with a checkbox. Note that WITH NOINIT will repeatedly write the backup to the same file, and it will get bigger and bigger. Typically you'll find that file names are constructed based on the date or at least the day of the week. –  Aaron Bertrand Nov 18 '13 at 16:36

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