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I recently wrote a script in which I needed an element to move to the top when it was clicked on. I used, and have been using for years, the following code in the onclick function:

this.parentNode.appendChild(this.parentNode.removeChild(this));

The script wasn't working, and so I messed around with the code, trying things I'd never done before in an effort to fix it. I thought the problem might lie in this line of code. Actually, it turned out to have nothing to do with it, but while I was tinkering around, I noticed that the following code seems to perform the same function.

this.parentNode.appendChild(this);

As far as I can tell, there is no difference. The former feels "better" to me, but I can't really say why. Is there an actual difference? If not, I'll start using the latter and save eighteen characters :-)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

this is not a child of this.
You need to remove the child from the parent node.

However, appendChild will implicitly remove the node from any existing parent (elements cannot have multiple parents):

If the node already exists it is removed from current parent node, then added to new parent node.

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Sorry, of course you are right. I left out a "parentNode" when I posted. I've edited the question. –  David John Welsh May 27 '11 at 2:54
    
Thank you for pointing me to the answer. I've been a lurker here for years, and this was the first time I had to ask a question myself. This really is a fantastic site. I'm also incredibly impressed with the speed with which it was answered. Thank you! –  David John Welsh May 27 '11 at 3:07

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