Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having trouble with the concept of interfaces interacting with polymorphic types (or even polymorphic interfaces). I'm developing in C# and would appreciate answers staying close to this definition, although i think that still gives plenty of room for everyone to put forth an answer.

Just as an example, let's say you want to make a program to paint things. You define an interface for the actor that Paints, and you define an interface for the subject which is painted, Furthermore you have some subjects which can be painted in a more specific way.

interface IPainter {
  void paint(IPaintable paintable);
}
interface IPaintable {
  void ApplyBaseLayer(Color c);
}
interface IDecalPaintable : IPaintable {
  void ApplyDecal(HatchBrush b);
}

I can imagine making a painter similar to the following:

class AwesomeDecalPainter : IPainter
  {
    public void paint(IPaintable paintable) {
      IDecalPaintable decalPaintable = (IDecalPaintable)paintable;
      decalPaintable.ApplyBaseLayer(Color.Red);
      decalPaintable.ApplyDecal(new HatchBrush(HatchStyle.Plaid, Color.Green));
    }
  }

Of course this will throw if paintable does not implement IDecalPaintable. It immediately introduces a coupling between the IPainter implementation and the IPaintable that it operates on. However I also don't think it makes sense to say that AwesomeDecalPainter is not an IPainter just because it's use is limited to a subset of the IPaintable domain.

So my question is really four-fold:

  • Are interface compatible with polymorphism at all?
  • Is it good design to implement an IPainter that can operate on IDecalPaintable?
  • What about if it can exclusively operate on IDecalPaintable?
  • Is there any literature or source code that exemplifies how interfaces and polymorphic types should interact?
share|improve this question
    
Maybe add the C# tag? –  Tony D May 27 '11 at 3:54
3  
For the reasons why IDecalPainter.paint is a bad design, see "What is the Liskov Substitution Principle?". What you should have is an overloaded paint that takes an IDecalPaintable so that AwesomeDecalPainter can accept both IPaintables and IDecalPaintables. –  outis May 27 '11 at 4:23
1  
... An IPainter should be able to paint on any IPaintable. It makes perfect sense to say that an AwesomeDecalPainter is not an IPainter because it can't operate on all IPaintables. See the circle-ellipse problem, also known as the square-rectangle problem –  outis May 27 '11 at 4:23
1  
You can add anything you want as long as you support IPaintable. What your interface is saying is that anyone who is an IPainter can also operate on any substrate that is an IPaintable to ApplyBaseLayer. That means I can have anyone from a kid from the ghetto to Rembrandt's apprentice show up, as long as they are an IPainter, and I can give them anything from a canvas to a brick wall, as long as it is an IPaintable, and they can ApplyBaseColor. Period. What else they can do is whatever else they can do. It is not defined by IPainter and IPaintable and as a client I don't know or care. –  Sisyphus May 27 '11 at 6:03
1  
@SmokingRope: interfaces aren't polymorphic because they don't have any methods; they only define method signatures. They support polymorphism because different classes implementing the same interface can have their own method implementations, yet all have the same methods with the same signatures. Defining a paint method with an IPaintable argument that only works on IDecalPaintable breaks not only the Liskov substitution principle, it breaks the type system. –  outis May 27 '11 at 6:11

4 Answers 4

The interface of a class is meant as a tool for the "user" of that class. An interface is a public presentation for the class, and it should advertise, to anyone considering to use it, what methods and constants are available and accessible from the outside. So, as it name suggests, it always sits between the user and the class implementing it.

On the other hand, an abstract class is a tool aimed at helping the "implementor" of the classes that extend it. It is an infrastructure that can impose restrictions and guidelines about what the concrete classes should look like. From a class design perspective, abstract classes are more architecturally important than interfaces. In this case, the implementor sits between the abstract class and the concrete one, building the latter on top of the former.

So to answer your question simply, Interface is a "contract" for the code to respect. When uused this way, it applies more to inheritance that polymorphism.

Abstract classes, they define a 'type'. And when the concrete sub classes use abstract classes and redefine methods, add new ones etc ... there you see polymorphism in action.

I know this post may confuse you more, it didn't make sense to me until I learned design patterns. With a few simple patterns under your belt you will better understand the role of each object and how inheritance, polymorphism and encapsulation play hand in hand to build cleanly designed applications.

Good-Luck

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer! –  Petr Abdulin May 27 '11 at 4:20
    
Agreed! I took on the book Head First design patterns and felt like his was everything they left out of the undergraduate program. Without it it's just a bunch of tools for your toolbox but you dont quite have the duct tape to put them all together yet. –  Mohgeroth May 27 '11 at 4:49

The problem is really that you have defined a vague interface, a contract is a more proper term. It's like you go into McDonalds and just order a burger:

interface Resturant
{
    Burger BuyBurger();
}

The person taking your order will look a bit confused for a while, but eventually he/she will serve you any burger since you don't specify what you want.

Same thing here. Do you really just want to define that something is paintable? If you ask me, it's like asking for trouble. Always try to make interfaces as specific as possible. It's always better to have several small specific interfaces than a large general one.

But let's go back to your example. In your case, all classes only have to be able to paint something. Therefore I would add another more specific interface:

    interface IPainter
    {
        void Paint(IPaintable paintable);
    }
    interface IDecalPainter : IPainter
    {
        void Paint(IDecalPaintable paintable);
    }
    interface IPaintable
    {
        void ApplyBaseLayer(Color c);
    }
    interface IDecalPaintable : IPaintable
    {
        void ApplyDecal(HatchBrush b);
    }

    class AwesomeDecalPainter : IDecalPainter
    {
        public void Paint(IPaintable paintable)
        {
            IDecalPaintable decalPaintable = paintable as IDecalPaintable;
            if (decalPaintable != null)
                Paint(decalPaintable);
            else
                paintable.ApplyBaseLayer(Color.Red);
        }

        public void Paint(IDecalPaintable paintable)
        {
            paintable.ApplyBaseLayer(Color.Red);
            paintable.ApplyDecal(new HatchBrush(HatchStyle.Plaid, Color.Green));
        }
    }

I would recommend that you read about the SOLID principles.

Update

A more sound interface implementation

    interface IPaintingContext
    {
        //Should not be object. But my System.Drawing knowledge is limited
        object DrawingSurface { get; set; }
    }
    interface IPaintable
    {
        void Draw(IPaintingContext context);
    }

    class AwesomeDecal : IPaintable
    {
        public void Draw(IPaintingContext paintable)
        {
            // draw decal
        }
    }

    class ComplexPaintableObject : IPaintable
    {
        public ComplexPaintableObject(IEnumerable<IPaintable> paintable)
        {
            // add background, border 
        }
    }

Here you can create as complex painting items as possible. They are now aware what they paint on, or what other paintables are used on the same surface.

share|improve this answer
    
You are suggesting that AwesomeDecalPainter degrade itself to painting things in a less awesome way? Seems to me that it's violating its purpose. –  SmokingRope May 27 '11 at 5:09
    
No, seems like it's behaving exactly as defined by the interface. The problem is not the degrading but the defined interface. –  jgauffin May 27 '11 at 5:19
    
I've added an alternative implementation making better use of interfaces. The Context interface could have some general painting methods instead, making it possible to paint on anything. –  jgauffin May 27 '11 at 5:27
    
In this second revision, the IPaintable interfaces are still limited to painting in exactly the manner allowed by IPaintingContext. There's no way for IPaintingContext to have a derived IAwesomePaintingContext that would be supported by the other interface. Thus, interfaces are incompatible with polymorphism? –  SmokingRope May 27 '11 at 5:50
    
No. Not true. The thing with OOP is that you MUST implement classes/interfaces as their contracts describe. Hence if IAwesomePaintingContext inherits IPaintingContext it should work as described by IPaintingContext if an object can only use IPaintingContext but not IAwesomePaintingContext. If a class cannot work with IPaintingContext it should not accept it but only a IAwesomePaintingContext. If you can't make that work, you need to refactor your architecture. –  jgauffin May 27 '11 at 6:28

Interfaces are not only compatible with polymorphism--they're essential to it. Part of the idea you seem to be missing is that if one has an interface like IPaintable, the expectation is that every object that implements it will provide some default method of being painted, typically encapsulating other methods which would configure the object in some useful fashion.

For example, an IPaintable interface might define a paint method:

void Paint(ICanvas canvas);

Note that the Paint method says nothing about what should be painted, nor what color, nor anything else. Various paintable objects would expose properties to control such things. A Polygon method, for example, might dispose OutlineColor and FillColor properties, along with a SetVertices() method. A routine that wants to paint a whole lot of objects could accept an IEnumerable(Of IPaintable) and simply call Paint on all of them, without having to know anything about how they'll be painted. The fact that an object is painted by calling Paint with no parameters other than the canvas upon which it should be painted in no way prevents the Paint method from doing all sorts of fancy gradient fills, texture mapping, ray tracing, or other graphical effects. The code which is commanding the painting would know nothing of such things, but the IPaintable objects themselves would hold all the information they needed and thus wouldn't need the calling code to supply it.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the best answer of the bunch. –  Zak Jun 10 '11 at 3:58
    
@Zak: Glad you like it. The idea of an application being able to paint something without having any idea what that actually entails goes back at least to the Macintosh; I remember running an old version of TeachText (like Notepad, but with the ability to show pictures that are embedded in a document's resource fork using some other program), which was written before color Macintoshes existed, on a Macintosh II, and being rather surprised when I opened up a document that contained a color picture and it showed up in color. It turns out the Macintosh picture support... –  supercat Jun 10 '11 at 14:40
    
...wasn't nearly as universal as that first experience made me think (old applications would be limited to eight colors) but I think the principle is applicable here. The fact that IPaintable only exposes a single boring Paint method doesn't in any way restrict the ability of the Paint method to do things far beyond anything an application using IPaintable might anticipate. –  supercat Jun 10 '11 at 14:42

Am i understanding your question correctly? I think your question is whether interface can exercise the essentials of inheritance ? (ie. child interface inheriting from parent interface).

1) if that's the case, syntactically sure, why not? 2) as for the practicability, it may be of little value because, your child interfaces are not essentially reusing anything from your parent interface.

share|improve this answer
    
My question is really broad, can an interface 'contract' specify polymorphic behavior. Can the interfaces specification exhibit polymorphic behavior. It's clearly possible, but is it a good idea? I think a lot of the comments in this thread have helped shed some light however. –  SmokingRope May 27 '11 at 7:18
    
#SmokingRobe, i might have turned your question into another one, which is based on my understanding to your question, and ive documented it. gray-suit.blogspot.com/2011/05/… As to answering whether this is a good idea, i want to ask one first. Why proceed with Interface and not just Sup/sub-classing? If you are already inheriting from one place, and can't 'directly' inherit from another. Then, like the posts above stated, you may need to refactor abit. –  Gary Tsui May 27 '11 at 8:39
    
Well the primary advantage of the interface in C# is multiple ineritance. More generally the interface means two implementors can be cast to the same interface without the implementations being related in a formal inheritance hierarchy. Unrelated types could have support for a common behavior without following the is-a relationship. –  SmokingRope May 27 '11 at 15:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.