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My Code is here. When am trying to execute i am getting an error lvalue required as left operand of assignment at 2nd line of the Program...Can any one help me out?

void main()
{

    unsigned char name[10]="ERPDIR",buff[30];
    (char *)buff = ASCII2HEX(name,buff);
    printf("The HEX Value is %s\n", buff);

}
char *ASCII2HEX(unsigned char *Response,unsigned char *buff)
{
    int len,hexlen=0,i=0;
    unsigned char BUFF[512]="";
#ifdef PRINT_CONSOLE
    printf("\n###### ASCII2HEX:");
#endif
    len = strlen((char*)Response);
    for(i=0;i<len;i++)
    {
        sprintf((char*)BUFF+(2*i),"%02X",Response[i]);
#ifdef PRINT_CONSOLE
        printf("%02X ",Response[i]);
#endif
    }
    printf("\n");
    BUFF[2*i]='\0';
    hexlen=len;
    memset(buff,0,sizeof(buff));
    AsciiStr2HexByte((const char*)BUFF,len*2,buff,&hexlen);
    buff[hexlen]='\0';
    return 0;
}
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1  
whats the code doing exactly, it is returning 0 ? and you are catching it in a char array trying to type cast it to a char * ? –  phoxis May 27 '11 at 5:01

5 Answers 5

Try using this line instead, i.e. don't do an assignment, just a function call:

ASCII2HEX(name,buff);

Your routine is already modifying buff, so it doesn't need to be assigned.

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1  
+1 Other answers identify problem. This is the solution. ASCII2HEX puts its result in the second parameter, not the function return value. –  Joel Lee May 27 '11 at 5:13

You can not put a cast on the left hand side of an assignment:

(char *)buff = ASCII2HEX(name,buff);
^^^^^^^^

Your code is confusing; on the one hand you are passing in a buffer, function signature passes out a pointer to a buffer, and you return 0!

[In addition to other problems, you might also want to watch out for buffer overrun...]

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If i didn't cast on the left hand side of assignment then am getting the following error "incompatible types when assigning to type ‘unsigned char[30]’ from type char *"...... –  Nikki May 27 '11 at 5:02
1  
because the type in the left side is char [] and you try to do it char * –  phoxis May 27 '11 at 5:06

First your buffer is not big enough you should you use buff[40] (10 * 4) you don't have to make assignment here ASCII2HEX always return 0

ASCII2HEX(name,buff);

i have changed the return type of ASCII2HEX into void you don't need a return value

void ASCII2HEX(unsigned char *Response,unsigned char *buff);
void main()
{

    unsigned char name[10]="ERPDIR",buff[30];
    ASCII2HEX(name,buff);
    printf("The HEX Value is %s\n", buff);

}
void ASCII2HEX(unsigned char *Response,unsigned char *buff)
{
    int len,hexlen=0,i=0;
    unsigned char BUFF[512]="";
#ifdef PRINT_CONSOLE
    printf("\n###### ASCII2HEX:");
#endif
    len = strlen((char*)Response);
    for(i=0;i<len;i++)
    {
        sprintf((char*)BUFF+(2*i),"%02X",Response[i]);
#ifdef PRINT_CONSOLE
        printf("%02X ",Response[i]);
#endif
    }
    printf("\n");
    BUFF[2*i]='\0';
    hexlen=len;
    memset(buff,0,sizeof(buff));
    AsciiStr2HexByte((const char*)BUFF,len*2,buff,&hexlen);
    buff[hexlen]='\0';
}
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You cannot cast something on the left hand side of the assignment, you need to do:

lvalue = (type) rvalue;

If you want to get the input inside buf then you already do it by passing it in the argument, the changes in the buff you do inside the function persists after the function call returns, as you have passed in as a pointer. So you do not assign buf again upon retuen. Also, you have returned 0 from the ascii function, and what it happens is upon return a 0 is assigned to the array base value location. so simply do not use the assignment into buf .

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buff is an array type, not an lvalue. While array types will decay to pointers on the right hand side of the assignment operator, the same is not true on the left hand side. So you can't re-assign the value of buff to point to something else since it does does not decay to an assignable pointer type.

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