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I would like to know which situation has more "overhead":

1) Case 1: 5 million objects sharing 30 functions. everytime a function is called, there is an overhead because it is necessary to do f.call(instance, arg1, arg2, etc)

 //example code
function makeObject()
{
  return { method1:func1,
           method2:func2,
           ...
           method30:func30 };
}

2) Case 2: 5 million objects with 30 functions each (= 150 million individual function instances). Everytime a function is called, there's no "routing-overhead" but of course at the sacrifice of having more instances

//example code
function makeObject()
{
  return { method1:func1.bind(asd),
           method2:func2.bind(asd),
           ...
           method30:func30.bind(asd) };
}

5 million is just a number my fingers typed out while my brain is still figuring out a nice number for an example.

Basically I want to know generally should we share functions whenever possible or create new ones?

(You can assume that i will never use the eval function anywhere in the entire page)

share|improve this question
    
I assume the 5m objects are being created dynamically? – tylermwashburn May 27 '11 at 7:06
3  
Run tests. That is the only way to know or sure. (Why not just use "the prototype chain" and let the engine "share" the functions?) – user166390 May 27 '11 at 7:06
    
5 million will be unrealistic, maybe for benchmarking purposes only – Ibu May 27 '11 at 7:10
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since almost all modern browsers optimize the prototype- and scopeschain lookup, you definitely should go for the sharing of methods.

The optimization technique described in simple words, is a kind of hash lookup table which the javascript engine uses to access propertys/methods from out of scope variables. So there is very little overhead in comparision to a classic scope chain lookup where the engine has to crawl through each parent scopes variable-/activation object.

This optimized lookup will only fail, if there is some kind of direct eval'ed code. Since an eval can change the propertys from a context, an engine must fallback to a classic lookup algorythm (which is kind of slow).

However, 5m objects are kind of unreal for Javascript-engines and I hope that those numbers are just examples. In a real world scenario, 5m objects calling n number of functions would create a stack overflow and "too long running script" errors everywhere around.

Alone the parsing time for 150 million functions will be disgraceful.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI Chrome (V8) and FF (TraceMonkey) both cache function declarations and only really create an object literal ({}) and a pointer for new functions with the same source, they don't re-parse and compile them. – zyklus May 27 '11 at 7:29
    
@cwolves: interesting. Is there any kind of resource where that technique is described in detail? I wonder where the limitations are (i.e. out of scope methods and evaled code). – jAndy May 27 '11 at 7:55
    
@cwolves do you mean to say that creating additional functions has minimal overhead (compared to scope chain lookup overhead) – Pacerier May 31 '11 at 3:10
    
And where this "Alone the parsing time for 150 million functions will be disgraceful." comes from? Each function is compiled once. Creation of 5m objects each having 30 properties is what will take time. – c-smile May 31 '11 at 3:44
    
@Pacerier, @c-smile -- I mean to say that newer browsers cache function compilation whereas older browsers do not. Meaning that this code: for(var i=0; i<10; i++){ foo.func = function(){ // stuff }; } is horribly inefficient in older browsers. In newer browsers, that middle piece (for iterations 2--10), is nearly identical in terms of speed to foo.func = {} – zyklus May 31 '11 at 19:59

If to assume the case 2 is about creation of object similar to this:

function makeObject()
{
  return { method1:func1,
           method2:func2,
           ...
           method30:func30 };
}

then you will have 5m of objects of 30 properties each. Not that "150 million individual function instances". Number of function instances will still be 30.

To create 5m of such objects will cost you something. Adding property is around 3-10 times more expensive than reading it. It means that creation of such set may take more time than your program will spent accessing methods using one level indirect addressing using the __proto__.

In short: for 5m/30 case 1 is more optimal in most situations. But there are cases when putting method references into objects itself is worth to consider. E.g. limited quantity (e.g. singletons) of frequently accessed objects/methods.

share|improve this answer
    
your code is for case 1. case 2 is not like this (I've updated the question with examples) – Pacerier May 31 '11 at 3:52
    
[quote] But there are cases when putting method references into objects itself is worth to consider. E.g. limited quantity (e.g. singletons) of frequently accessed objects/methods.[/quote] sorry do you mind elaborating? (i don't really get it) – Pacerier May 31 '11 at 3:53
    
@Pacerier: As I said, if you have singleton object (e.g. emulation of namespaces in JS is made by singleton objects) then it makes sense to put functions directy into such singleton objects. If you have classic object/class situation where many instances share the same class (a.k.a. prototype) then you should go with .prototype.foo = function(){} option. – c-smile Jun 11 '11 at 19:41
    
s ok got it (btw i'm testing if this will notify you, please tell me if it does.. thx) – Pacerier Jun 12 '11 at 2:32

And why not this way? :

function myObject() { }

myObject.prototype.method1 = func1
myObject.prototype.method2 = func2,
           ...
myObject.prototype.method30 = func30

And so if you create your object as

var obj = new myObject();

then you will call its methods as:

obj.method1(); 
obj.method2(); 

Without need of the call() and other magic...

In this case you will not need to populate each instance of your object by the same 30 properties.

share|improve this answer
    
my question is targeted at multiple inheritance issues. so basically i was wondering if class B extends class A then should instances of class B use the same function-instance as instances of class A? or should we create new function-instances for each instance (since its easier this way) – Pacerier Jun 1 '11 at 8:28

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