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I would like to create a template in xslt with a condition on the parameter of the tag I am matching.

for exemple: If I have the tags <par class="class1"> and <par class="class2">

I would like to create a template like this :

<xsl:template match="par">
 <xsl:if test="class=class1">
  <fo:block
    space-before="3pt"
    space-after="3pt">

    <xsl:apply-templates />

  </fo:block>
 </xsl:if>
 <xsl:otherwise>
  <fo:block
    space-before="10pt"
    space-after="10pt">

    <xsl:apply-templates />

  </fo:block>
 </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:template>

But it doesn't work. How can I test on the parameter of the tag ?

thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
You'll find it easier to get answers (both here and from books and online searches) if you learn the jargon. You're talking about elements and attributes, not tags and parameters. –  Michael Kay May 27 '11 at 12:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The technical term for these “parameters” is “attributes” (just in case that helps for future searches) and you refer to them with @class etc.

Also note that <xsl:otherwise> is not for <xsl:if>, but for <xsl:choose>:

<xsl:template match="par">
  <xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="@class='class1'">
      <fo:block
        space-before="3pt"
        space-after="3pt">

        <xsl:apply-templates />

      </fo:block>
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
      <fo:block
        space-before="10pt"
        space-after="10pt">

        <xsl:apply-templates />

      </fo:block>
    </xsl:otherwise>
  </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

Or, to better show the actual differences,

<xsl:template match="par">
  <fo:block>
    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test="@class='class1'">
        <xsl:attribute name='space-before'>3pt</xsl:attribute>
        <xsl:attribute name='space-after'>3pt</xsl:attribute>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:attribute name='space-before'>10pt</xsl:attribute>
        <xsl:attribute name='space-after'>10pt</xsl:attribute>
      </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
    <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </fo:block>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
1  
You are wrong with attributes quotes: <xsl:attribute name="space-after" select="'10pt'"/> ` –  Phillip Kovalev May 27 '11 at 8:33
2  
Actually, you're both wrong; Which quotes you use to enclose the value of the attribute, and the string value within it are actually interchangeable, as long as you don't use the same one. The real problem with the answer is that the test clause doesn't enclose the class1 value in quotes. Incidentally, you can't use select on <xsl:attribute> in xslt1, only XSLT2 can do that. –  Flynn1179 May 27 '11 at 8:49
    
ok, thanks a lot for your answer –  Ricky Bobby May 27 '11 at 9:18
    
@Flynn1179: Right, of course. Fixed. –  Christopher Creutzig May 30 '11 at 10:45

At first <xsl:if/> is "standalone" instruction. You can use xsl:choose, if you needs in the default case.

In your code xsl:if test xpath are invalid. Use @attribute_name for attribute access and single quotes for string literals.

Fixed code:

<xsl:template match="par">
 <xsl:choose>
 <xsl:when test="@class = 'class1'">
  <fo:block
    space-before="3pt"
    space-after="3pt">
    <xsl:apply-templates />
  </fo:block>
 </xsl:when>
 <xsl:otherwise>
  <fo:block
    space-before="10pt"
    space-after="10pt">
    <xsl:apply-templates />
  </fo:block>
 </xsl:otherwise>
 <xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

But there is more elegant solution for you task:

<xsl:template match="par">
    <fo:block
      space-before="10pt"
      space-after="10pt">

        <xsl:if test="@class = 'class1'">
            <xsl:attribute name="space-before" select="'3pt'"/>
            <xsl:attribute name="space-after" select="'3pt'"/>
        </xsl:if>

        <xsl:apply-templates />

    </fo:block>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer

You can actually use a different template rather than using <xsl:if>. Like this:

<xsl:template match="par[@class='class1']">
  ..
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="par">
  ..
</xsl:template>

The second template is used for any par elements that are not matched by the first. Although the second template can match all par elements, it is overridden by the first because the latter is more specific.

share|improve this answer

You access attributes using @ and you can test the value of an attribute as follows:

<xsl:if test="@class = 'class1'">
    ....
</xsl:if>

or check if an attribute exists using

<xsl:if test="@class">
   ...
</xsl:if>
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