Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class definition with a virtual method.

On compiling I get the error that 'MethodType Class::Method' is not a static member of class Class

The most popular solution I have found is to add the keyword static to the Method definition in the header file.

However, the method is defined as virtual. So to add the static keyword I will have to remove the virtual keyword. Unfortunately that cannot be done as the class inherits from a parent where this method is also declared virtual, leading to another compiler error. (Please note, I'm using defined interfaces and have no access to the parent class's source code)

Does anyone have any ideas?


Header file:

class X : public OtherClass
{
   public:
      X();
      ~X();  

     virtual structType MethodName(ParamType1,ParamType2);

};

Then in the CPP file I have:

structType * X::MethodName(ParamType1 P1, ParamType2 P2)
{
   //Implementation here
}

And that gets flagged with error:

'structType* X::MethodName' is not a static member of 'class X'
share|improve this question
2  
We need to see your class definition. At present I cannot tell what you are asking. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 27 '11 at 9:02
    
This doesn't make much sense. If the base function that you're overriding is virtual, removing the keyword virtual from the derived function that overrides it does not result in a compile error; in fact it does nothing at all! –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 27 '11 at 9:04
    
Could you provide some code? Most possibly you call the method like a static method, not like an instance one. –  Centro May 27 '11 at 9:05
1  
"The most popular solution I have found is to add the keyword static to the Method definition in the header file.", "So to add the static keyword I will have to remove the virtual keyword." - please spend time and learn the concepts behind these keywords, these are not random on/off switches to get the code to compile. –  Laurynas Biveinis May 27 '11 at 9:15
    
@Laurynas Biveinis: I understand the concepts behind the keyword, and as I said if I remove the 'virtual' keyword, beyond all reason I get yet another error. 'Method cannot be declared since vitrual Method declared in base class" –  GreatCthulhu May 27 '11 at 9:19

3 Answers 3

You have to make it static if you want to call the method without an object of that class. This makes no sense for virtual methods.
You must create an object of that class, and then call the method.

struct X {
   static int bar();
   int foo();

};

X::bar(); // Works, static method called
X::foo(); // Doesn't work (your problem)

X x;
x.bar(); // Works, but X::bar() recommended (so that one sees that it's static...)
x.foo(); // Works, your solution
share|improve this answer
    
And it's not called a "method". –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 27 '11 at 9:06
    
@centro and @Tomalak Geret'kal: class X : public OtherClass { public: X(); ~X(); virtual structType MethodName(ParamType1,ParamTYpe2); }; Then in the CPP file I have: structType * X::MethodName(ParamType1 P1, ParamType2 P2) { //Implementation here } And that gets flagged with error: 'structType* X::MethodName' is not a static member of 'class X' –  GreatCthulhu May 27 '11 at 9:11
    
@GreaetCthulhu: Edit it into the question please. The class definition, how you're using it, what you expect, and what you actually see. We don't know what the question is. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 27 '11 at 9:15

I think you have a parsing error.

Your class definition says:

class X : public OtherClass {
   public:
      X();
     ~X();
     virtual structType MethodName(ParamType1,ParamTYpe2);
}; 

But your definition for MethodName has a different return type:

structType* X::MethodName(ParamType1 P1, ParamType2 P2) {
    //Implementation here
}

The compiler's not really sure what to make of that, and thinks you're trying to do something with a non-existent static member, for some reason.

The solution is to fix your function definition and declaration so that the function has one, single, consistent return type. Either structType or structType*.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the assist. I fixed so the two return types match (that was a stupid oversight on my part). However the compiler is still telling me that X::MethodName is not a statis member of class X. –  GreatCthulhu May 27 '11 at 9:24
    
Newest update: I got frustrated and moved the files to a backup space. I created new files and copied the code from the old files to the new. They compile perfectly fine. This made me suspiscious so I compiled the new files on two other machines, without problem. When I move the old files to the other machines, they still fail to compile. I thought I must've missed something in the copying so I used diff to check the old vs. new files and diff reports no differences. I think it's safe to write this one off as weird Unix voodoo. Thanks for the assist all. –  GreatCthulhu May 27 '11 at 10:04
    
@GreatCthulhu: Please write your solution as an answer to the question, and accept it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 27 '11 at 14:09
    
I can't do so within the first 8 hours of posting my question as I have less than 100 rep. Will do that as soon as I can though. Thanks for your help and apologies for wasting your time on this. –  GreatCthulhu May 27 '11 at 14:52
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Figured it out.

Finally. In the implementation of MethodName1

     structType * X::MethodName(ParamType1 P1, ParamType2 P2)

ParamType1 was a non-standard type. It is actually a class in the underlying application to which I have only the API.

Turns out that the implemtation for class ParamType1 was missing / not compiled / something.

The problem with linking was not to do with the class I loaded, even though it would appear as such because of the line the compiler provided. So for future reference, when using classes and struct in a function definition, keep an eye out for this linking error.

Thanks for the assist again everyone.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.