Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say we have a two dimensional arrays, arr[N][N], where N is a constant integer. Assume that every element of arr is initialized.

How do I print the elements of arr antidiagonal-wise using nested for loops?

What I mean is:

  • After first iteration of the outer-most loop, arr[0][0] will be printed
  • After second iteration of the outer-most loop, arr[0][1] and arr[1][0] will be printed
  • After third iteration of the outer-most loop, arr[0][2], arr[1][1], and arr[2][0] will be printed
  • ...
  • After the last iteration of the outer-most loop, arr[N-1][N-1] will be printed.

Thanks for your time!

share|improve this question
1  
Looks like homework? :P –  evgeny May 27 '11 at 9:37
    
lol it's true that the question kind of worded like a hw problem, but it's actually not ;) –  Demi May 27 '11 at 9:41
2  
JPEG's zigzag traversal? –  Gary Tsui May 27 '11 at 9:41

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Sorry to everybody who wrote "The second half should be similar"... it's not.

Anyway, here you go:

// traverse array diagonally
int c, tmp, x;
for (c = N - 1; c > -N; c--) {
    tmp = N - abs(c) - 1;
    x = tmp;
    while (x >= 0) {
        if (c >= 0) {
            std::cout << arr[x][tmp - x] << ", ";
        }
        else {
            std::cout << arr[N - (tmp - x) - 1][(N-1)-x] << ", ";
        }
        --x;
    }
    std::cout << "\n";
}

Do you need this for a game or something?

[edit] looking at this again, I think my answer wasn't very nicely written. Here's a quick run through:

Let's pretend that N is 3.

What we need is an iteration over coordinate-combinations that looks like this:

(0, 0)
(1, 0), (0, 1)
(2, 0), (1, 1), (0, 2)
(2, 1), (1, 2)
(2, 2)

So first some placeholders:

int c,    // a counter, set by the outer loop
    tmp,  // for intermediate results
    x;    // the x-index into *arr* (*y* will be defined implicitly)

Now this outer loop

for (c = N - 1; c > -N; c--) { 

makes c iterate over {2, 1, 0, -1, 2}.

The next step

    tmp = N - abs(c) - 1;
    x = tmp;

turns {2, 1, 0, -1, -2} into {0, 1, 2, 1, 0}, which are the lengths of the needed outputs at this step minus one (so they can be used as indices). We make two copies of this, tmp and x.

Now we count down from x to 0:

    while (x >= 0) {
        ...
        --x;
    }

if we're on the upper-left half of arr, indicated by c >= 0, the x-indices into arr need to start at the diagonal and go down to zero (0 to 0, 1 to 0 and 2 to 0) , whereas the y-indices need to start at zero and go up to the diagonal (0 to 0, 0 to 1 and 0 to 2):

        if (c >= 0) {
            std::cout << arr[x][tmp - x] << ", ";
        }

once we're on the lower-right half, the x-indices need to start at N and to down to the diagonal (2 to 1 and 2 to 2), whereas the y-indices need to start at the diagonal and go up to N (1 to 2 and 2 to 2):

        else {
            std::cout << arr[N - (tmp - x) - 1][(N-1)-x] << ", ";
        }

finally we just need a line-break at the end of each line:

    std::cout << "\n";

Savy? :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for giving me a complete answer ;). I need this because there is a nested for-loop that cannot be parallelized row-wise or column-wise because of data dependencies, so it can only be done antidiagonal-wise. –  Demi Jun 3 '11 at 4:35
    
Ok? Sounds scary :-) Well, if it works for you, can you click 'accept' please? Thanks!! :-) –  Jan Jun 3 '11 at 11:40

This will work for half the matrix.. the other half will be similar:

for (j = 0 ; j < N ; j++)
{
   for (i = 0 ; i <= j ; i ++)
   {
      printf("%d \n",a[i,j-i]);
   }
}
share|improve this answer

You can notice that for any diagonal, 2 "adjacent" elements are given by [x][y] and [x+1][y-1]: that is, you take a diagonal step to the right and up.

So you can have a loop that sets the first cell of the diagonal. You only need to iterate through all values of y, starting at [0][y], and then do this right-up step (diagonally) until you hit the top side or the right side. Then you will need to do the same by moving across from [0][N-1] to [N-1][N-1] to cover the second half.

Code follows:

for (int _y = 0; _y < N; _y++) {
    int x = 0, y = _y;
    while (x < N && y >= 0) {
        cout << arr[x][y];
        x++; y--;
    }

    cout << endl; // don't forget a newline
}

I am going to leave out the second half of the code, because it should be about the same.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for explanation, even though I like the code in other answers better –  Jitse Niesen May 27 '11 at 12:05

Here is a snippet of java code, but the algo is the same

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
    for(int j = 0; j <= i; j++){
        System.out.print(a[j][i-j] + " ");
    }
    System.out.println();
}
share|improve this answer

Looks something like this:

for(row = 0; row < N; row++){  
   for(j = 0; j <= row; j++){  
      print Array[row - j][j];  
   }  
   newline;  
}  
share|improve this answer

Here is the solution for both halves of the matrix:

    //First half (including middle diagonal)
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j <= i; j++) {
            print array[j][i - j];
        }
        newline;
    }

    //Second half (excluding middle diagonal)
    for (int i = n - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        for (int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
            print array[n - i + j][n - j - 1];
        }
        newline;
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.