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I have the following problem:
We have an application that loads modules (add ons). These modules might need entries in the app.config (e.g. WCF configuration). Because the modules are loaded dynamically, I don't want to have these entries in the app.config file of my application.
What I would like to do is the following:

  • Create a new app.config in memory that incorporates the config sections from the modules
  • Tell my application to use that new app.config

Note: I do not want to overwrite the default app.config!

It should work transparently, so that for example ConfigurationManager.AppSettings uses that new file.

During my evaluation of this problem, I came up with the same solution as is provided here: Reload app.config with nunit.
Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to do anything, because I still get the data from the normal app.config.

I used this code to test it:

Console.WriteLine(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SettingA"]);
Console.WriteLine(Settings.Default.Setting);

var combinedConfig = string.Format(CONFIG2, CONFIG);
var tempFileName = Path.GetTempFileName();
using (var writer = new StreamWriter(tempFileName))
{
    writer.Write(combinedConfig);
}

using(AppConfig.Change(tempFileName))
{
    Console.WriteLine(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SettingA"]);
    Console.WriteLine(Settings.Default.Setting);
}

It prints the same values twices, although combinedConfig contains other values than the normal app.config.

share|improve this question
    
Hosting the modules in separate AppDomain with the appropriate configuration file is not an option? –  João Angelo May 27 '11 at 10:36
    
Not really, because that would result in lots of Cross-AppDomain calls, because the application interacts quite heavily with the modules. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 10:37
    
How about an application restart when a new module needs to be loaded? –  João Angelo May 27 '11 at 10:47
    
This doesn't work together with the business requirements. Furthermore, I can't overwrite the app.config, because the user doesn't have the right to do so. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 10:48
    
You would be reloading to load a different App.config, not the one in program files. The hack in Reload app.config with nunit could work, not sure, if used on application entry before any configuration is loaded. –  João Angelo May 27 '11 at 10:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 139 down vote accepted

The hack in the linked question works if it is used before the configuration system is used the first time. After that, it doesn't work any more.
The reason:
There exists a class ClientConfigPaths that caches the paths. So, even after changing the path with SetData, it is not re-read, because there already exist cached values. The solution is to remove these, too:

public abstract class AppConfig : IDisposable
{
    public static AppConfig Change(string path)
    {
        return new ChangeAppConfig(path);
    }

    public abstract void Dispose();

    private class ChangeAppConfig : AppConfig
    {
        private readonly string oldConfig =
            AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetData("APP_CONFIG_FILE").ToString();

        private bool disposedValue;

        public ChangeAppConfig(string path)
        {
            AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetData("APP_CONFIG_FILE", path);
            ResetConfigMechanism();
        }

        public override void Dispose()
        {
            if (!disposedValue)
            {
                AppDomain.CurrentDomain.SetData("APP_CONFIG_FILE", oldConfig);
                ResetConfigMechanism();


                disposedValue = true;
            }
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

        private static void ResetConfigMechanism()
        {
            typeof(ConfigurationManager)
                .GetField("s_initState", BindingFlags.NonPublic | 
                                         BindingFlags.Static)
                .SetValue(null, 0);

            typeof(ConfigurationManager)
                .GetField("s_configSystem", BindingFlags.NonPublic | 
                                            BindingFlags.Static)
                .SetValue(null, null);

            typeof(ConfigurationManager)
                .Assembly.GetTypes()
                .Where(x => x.FullName == 
                            "System.Configuration.ClientConfigPaths")
                .First()
                .GetField("s_current", BindingFlags.NonPublic | 
                                       BindingFlags.Static)
                .SetValue(null, null);
        }
    }
}

Usage is like this:

// the default app.config is used.
using(AppConfig.Change(tempFileName))
{
    // the app.config in tempFileName is used
}
// the default app.config is used.

If you want to change the used app.config for the whole runtime of your application, simply put AppConfig.Change(tempFileName) without the using somewhere at the start of your application.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is really, really excellent. Thank you so much for posting this. –  user981225 Nov 12 '12 at 16:57
    
@Daniel this is awesome! Thank you! No need to load another AppDomain anymore! –  bigfoot Nov 23 '12 at 23:58
1  
@Daniel That was awesome -- I worked it into an exentension method for ApplicationSettingsBase, so that I can call Settings.Default.RedirectAppConfig(path). I'd give you +2 if I could! –  JMarsch Feb 14 '13 at 17:50
1  
@PhilWhittington: That's what I am saying, yes. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 6 '13 at 12:33
1  
out of interest, is there any reason to suppress the finalizer is there is no finalizer declared? –  Gusdor Apr 1 at 10:19

You can try to use Configuration and Add ConfigurationSection on runtime

Configuration applicationConfiguration = ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedExeConfiguration(
                        new ExeConfigurationFileMap(){ExeConfigFilename = path_to_your_config,
                        ConfigurationUserLevel.None
                        );

applicationConfiguration.Sections.Add("section",new YourSection())
applicationConfiguration.Save(ConfigurationSaveMode.Full,true);

EDIT: Here is solution based on reflection (not very nice though)

Create class derived from IInternalConfigSystem

public class ConfigeSystem: IInternalConfigSystem
{
    public NameValueCollection Settings = new NameValueCollection();
    #region Implementation of IInternalConfigSystem

    public object GetSection(string configKey)
    {
        return Settings;
    }

    public void RefreshConfig(string sectionName)
    {
        //throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public bool SupportsUserConfig { get; private set; }

    #endregion
}

then via reflection set it to private field in ConfigurationManager

        ConfigeSystem configSystem = new ConfigeSystem();
        configSystem.Settings.Add("s1","S");

        Type type = typeof(ConfigurationManager);
        FieldInfo info = type.GetField("s_configSystem", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static);
        info.SetValue(null, configSystem);

        bool res = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["s1"] == "S"; // return true
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how this helps me. This will add a section to the file specified by file_path. This will not make the section available to users of ConfigurationManager.GetSection, because GetSection uses the default app.config. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 10:13
    
You can add Sections to your existing app.config. Just tried this - works for me –  Stecya May 27 '11 at 10:24
    
Quote from my question: "Note: I do not want to overwrite the default app.config!" –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 10:26
4  
What's wrong? Simple: The user has no right to overwrite it, because the program is installed in %ProgramFiles% and the user is no administrator. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 10:33
1  
@Stecya: Thanks for your effort. But please see my answer for the real solution to the problem. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 11:35

Daniel, if possible try to use other config mechanisms. We have been through this route where we had different static/dynamic config files depending on environment/profile/group and it became quite messy at the end.

you could try out some sort of Profile WebService where you only specify one Web Service URL from the client and depending on Client's details (you might have Group/User level overrides), it loads up all the config it needs. We have also used MS Enterprise Library for some part of it.

that was you dont deploy config with your client and you can manage it separately from your clients

share|improve this answer
3  
Thanks for your answer. However, the whole reason of this is to avoid shipping config files. The configuration details for the modules are loaded from a database. But because I want to give module developers the comfort of the default .NET configuration mechanism, I want to incorporate those module configurations into one config file at runtime and make this the default config file. The reason is simple: There exist a lot of libraries that can be configured through app.config (e.g. WCF, EntLib, EF, ...). If I would introduce another config mechanism, the configuration would (cont.) –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 10:22
    
(cont.) have to be moved to the code of the module. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 10:22
    
i see, it is step in the right direction then :) –  Bek Raupov May 27 '11 at 10:25

If your config file is just written with key/values in "appSettings", then you can read another file with such code :

System.Configuration.ExeConfigurationFileMap configFileMap = new ExeConfigurationFileMap();
configFileMap.ExeConfigFilename = configFilePath;

System.Configuration.Configuration configuration = ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedExeConfiguration(configFileMap, ConfigurationUserLevel.None);
AppSettingsSection section = (AppSettingsSection)configuration.GetSection("appSettings");

Then you can read section.Settings as collection of KeyValueConfigurationElement.

share|improve this answer
    
As I already said, I want to make ConfigurationManager.GetSection read the new file I created. Your solution doesn't do that. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 10:42
    
@Daniel : why ? You can specify any file in "configFilePath". So you just need to know the location of your new created file. Did I miss something ? Or you really need to use "ConfigurationManager.GetSection" and nothing else ? –  Ron May 27 '11 at 10:43
1  
Yes you do miss something: ConfigurationManager.GetSection uses the default app.config. It doesn't care about the config file you opened with OpenMappedExeConfiguration. –  Daniel Hilgarth May 27 '11 at 10:45

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