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I am new to SQL server, thus looking for some quick help on writing stored procedure:

brief about what I am doing: employee says he is expert (type) in different domains (industries) and willing to work in countries of choice (mycountries) and my sal (minsal)and my native country (orgcountry)

Employer says he need so and so expert in the his choice of domain (industries) in the countries where openings are there and with sal range.

employee table has lots of records with columns like this: name, email, myindustries, mycountries, mytype,minsal

employer table has lots of records with columns like: expertneed, inindustries, incountries, sal-from, sal-to

now when employee logs in, he/she should get all the records of matching employers

when employer logs in, he/she also get all the records of matching employees.

can some one help in writing sp for this? appreciate any help

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3  
Please post the code you have written so far. People generally do not like to just write your code for you. As it is, this is a work description, not a question. –  Mitch Wheat May 27 '11 at 11:19
    
Do the industries and countries fields contain multiple values per record? ie. if an employee works in 2 different industries, would both industries appear in the same column on the same record, or would there be multiple rows for that one employee? –  TabbyCool May 27 '11 at 12:05
    
Mitch,I am sorry, I never written sp. I only know simple sql statements. Pls do understand. –  PNM May 27 '11 at 12:13
    
Tabby, yes: Here the countries and industries are multiple (storing ids of countries and industries in respective columns separated with comma). That is is main place where I am stuck. i.e. employee says he is willing to work for USA, UK, INDIA, CANADA etc (ids of this stored in the mycountries colum separated by comma). Both employee and employer has country and industry as multi choice –  PNM May 27 '11 at 12:14

1 Answer 1

If you're storing comma-separated ids then you'll need a function to split a string into multiple rows. This is how you would use it:

SELECT DISTINCT employee.name [employee], employer.name [employer]
FROM employee
    OUTER APPLY dbo.split(employee.myindustries) myi (industry)
    OUTER APPLY dbo.split(employee.mycountries) myc (country)
JOIN employer
    OUTER APPLY dbo.split(employer.inindustries) ini (industry)
    OUTER APPLY dbo.split(employer.incountries) inc (country)
WHERE employer.expertneed = employee.type
    AND ini.inindustries = myi.industry
    AND inc.incountries = myc.country
    AND employee.minsal BETWEEN employer.[sal-from] AND employer.[sal-to]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Anthony. Here the countries and industries are multiple (storing ids of countries and industries in respective columns separated with comma). That is is main place where I am stuck. i.e. employee says he is willing to work for USA, UK, INDIA, CANADA etc (ids of this stored in the mycountries colum separated by comma). Both employee and employer has country and industry as multi choice. –  PNM May 27 '11 at 12:11
1  
@PNM - normalize that data and it will be much easier –  JNK May 27 '11 at 12:12
    
I am basically not a database guy, except writing simple SQL statement to insert/update I am not much aware of any thing else :(. May be some one laughs, but I can only reply to them with apology. –  PNM May 27 '11 at 12:17
1  
@PNM - nobody is laughing, people ask questions because they don't know. Basically your table has a poor design, and that's why its so hard to get the data you want. You can have LOOKUP TABLES that have a row for each employee/country combination, and same thing for employers. then you can join to those lookup tables and get the info you want without having to break apart comma-separated strings –  JNK May 27 '11 at 12:19

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