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I'm running this query:

CREATE TABLE
SELECT people.*, Sheet1.department
  FROM people LEFT JOIN Sheet1 ON people.depno = Sheet1.depno

On a set of tables detailing employee records.

The goal is to create a new table that has all the "people" data, plus a human-readable department name. Simple, right?

The problem is that each record in the resulting table appears to be duplicated exactly (with literally every field being the same), turning a roughly 23,000-record table into a roughly 46,000-record table. I say "roughly" because it's not an exact doubling -- there's a difference of about a hundred records.

Some details: The "people" table contains 15 fields, including the "depno" field, which is an integer indicating department.

The "Sheet1" table is, as one would guess, a table generated from an imported xls file containing two fields: the shared "depno" and a new "department" (the latter being a verbose department name corresponding to the depno in question). There are 44 records in the "Sheet1" table.

Thanks in advance for any pointers on this. Let me know what other information you can use from me.


Update: Here's the code I ended up using, from my response to Johan (thanks again to everyone who worked on this):

CREATE TABLE morebetter 
    SELECT people.*, Sheet1.department FROM people 
    LEFT JOIN Sheet1 ON people.depno = Sheet1.depno 
    GROUP BY id 
share|improve this question
    
1  
Is depno unique in the Sheet1 table? Sounds like you might have duplicates. –  Steve Mayne May 27 '11 at 12:40
    
Thanks, guys. I'll take a look at those. (Steve: Sorry, I didn't see your answer before Daren's -- see my response to him.) –  eternalnewb May 27 '11 at 12:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The people.depno is not unique, that's why you're getting the doubling.

Change the SELECT part to

SELECT DISTINCT people.*, Sheet1.department
  FROM people LEFT JOIN Sheet1 ON people.depno = Sheet1.depno

This will eliminate duplicate rows.

In MySQL you can also write

SELECT people.*, Sheet1.department
FROM people LEFT JOIN Sheet1 ON people.depno = Sheet1.depno
GROUP BY people.depno

Which works slightly different.
The first query eliminates rows with duplicate output, the second query eliminates records with duplicate people.depno, even if people.depno does not appear in the output.

I like the second form, because it makes explicit which duplicate you're trying to eliminate and you don't need to tweak the output.
It's also slightly faster in executing time.

***Warning***
The group by version will eliminate any double people.depno it finds, but if the other fields in the select are not identical it will just choose one at random!
In other words. If the outcome of the select distinct is different from the group by version that means that MySQL is silently dropping non-duplicate rows.
This may or may not be what you want!

In order to be safe, do a group by on all fields that you care about!
If the group by is on a unique key than it's pointless to include further fields from the same table as that unique key.

share|improve this answer
    
Johan, a combination of your two approaches was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks a bunch! (Here's the final query for reference - advance apologies if my attempt at mini-Markdown fails): code CREATE TABLE morebetter SELECT people.*, Sheet1.department FROM people LEFT JOIN Sheet1 ON people.depno = Sheet1.depno GROUP BY id, people.uid, fy, title code Hopefully your answer helps someone else in the future when it appears that MySQL is doubling records in query results. It certainly helped me. –  eternalnewb May 27 '11 at 13:42
    
@user490581: MySQL is not doubling any records, unless your data or your query says so. Can you please post the result of this query?: SELECT COUNT(*), COUNT(DISTINCT depno) FROM Sheet1 –  ypercube May 27 '11 at 14:14
    
Nice work. Just when I think I'm certain about something, everybody turns out to be right in their basic initial question. I re-examined the Sheet1 contents, and while the depno fields are unique in the original spreadsheet, some sort of import problem must have indeed caused them to be repeated in the MySQL version. Thanks for the continued skepticism, ypercube: Along with a band-aid, I now have the situation's origin. (And, since I wouldn't want to deny you a response to your initial question, the query results are 86 and 42 for count(*) and count(distinct depno), respectively.) –  eternalnewb May 27 '11 at 14:44

Sounds like the Sheet1.depno field isn't unique?

share|improve this answer
    
Good question, Daren. Sheet1.depno is unique within the "Sheet1" table's records, but you're right: It's not unique within the "people" table's records. –  eternalnewb May 27 '11 at 12:45
    
Whoops -- I was 100% wrong on this. See my response to ypercube. Consider this my tasty crow dinner. –  eternalnewb May 27 '11 at 14:46

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