Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been using the Youtube json api for making a new mash-up.
Somewhere in the response you can find the following:

{
"player":
  {
  "default":"http://www.youtube.com/watch?v\u003deH5Iysm417U"
  }
}

I've always learned not to use any words mentioned in the reserved words section of the ECMAScript standard as identifiers. So as far as I know it's not allowed to use the name "default" as a property name. Why is Youtube doing this?

player.default

To be honest, the above code works fine in a browser. But I had to change it to the code beneath in order to have no compile errors when using the Google closure compiler.

player["default"]

It just feels wrong.
The most important question here is, can I do anything about it?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

An Identifier is not the same as a PropertyName.

PropertyName need only not consist of reserved words when declared without quotes. When declared with quotes, then all strings are valid, even " ".

Here is the list of the valid productions:

 PropertyName :    
     Identifier    
     StringLiteral    
     NumericLiteral

http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/files/ECMA-ST-ARCH/ECMA-262,%203rd%20edition,%20December%201999.pdf, 11.1.15

You cannot change the response from Youtube, and allthough there is nothing wrong with player.default, you will simply need to use the [] accessor if you want to avoid this error in the closure compiler.

But really, this is a bug with the compiler, not the javascript.

share|improve this answer
    
Sean, thanks for the explanation. –  denbuzze May 28 '11 at 8:51

The compiler might be flagging this up due to cross-browser compatibility issues.

I hit the same thing recently with both default and extends when creating a template library which uses code instead of parsing text. The code worked just fine, but the Closure Compiler complained about those keywords when used as properties... then I tried it in IE:

>>> var o = {default: 'test'}
SyntaxError: Expected identifier, string or number
>>> var o = {'default': 'test'}
>>> o.default
SyntaxError: Expected identifier
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.