Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

When I am developing an iPhone app for a company, I will choose an app name and app id during the development process and will use the developer identity and certificates connected with my developer account. When the app is finished and ready to be submitted to the app store, I am running into a couple of problems:

  • It is not possible (or at least very hard) to change the ownership of an app that has already been submitted to the app store. So I can not submit the app using my credentials and change the ownership later.
  • When I get login credentials for iTunes connect from the company, I can create a new app id and certificates to build the app for submission. But I can not use the same app id I am using for development because the app id has to be unique. Also, the company can not simply add me as an admin user because then I do not have the necessary privileges to create an app id or certificates.

I am wondering what is the best way to handle this situation when developing apps as a freelance for different companies? How do you handle that?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The company should create the app id in iTunes and then add you as a member of their team. You then download the profiles etc that you need.

Easy.

share|improve this answer
    
This only works if the client is able to create the necessary profiles and app ids. And I still need to use a different bundle id. – Monkey King May 27 '11 at 13:35
    
You don't need a different bundle id. I guess what I'm really driving at is that the company needs to be in charge of the process and take ownership of it. If they don't have the expertise, then they need to give you the admin password to their account so you can do it for them, then they can always change the password to retain control. It becomes especially important to do it the right way as soon as you get into larger apps with purchases or pushes as there is so much more to administer. – Roger May 27 '11 at 14:03
    
I think its really a question of the company's expertise. If they don't have the know-how which is often the case, I guess you have to take control of their iTunes Connect account. Otherwise they can generate the necessary profiles for you. Starting with a different bundle ID might also be necessary sometimes, especially when the company does not have an iTunes Connect account yet. – Monkey King May 30 '11 at 11:02

See this SO question about how to submit an application for a client.

I do the following:

When I start a project for a client, I do so using my own developer credentials. What is important to note is that I use a wildcard profile which I can use to develop any kind of app (except apps that might use Push Notification or In-App Purchase).

When it comes time to submit the app for the client, I simply build with the client's Distribution profile (see the link above). But I also have to change the bundle id to match the client profile, e.g. com.client.fooapp.

The whole thing isn't that complicated or difficult, but it is not exactly seamless either.

share|improve this answer
    
@MarkGranoff you link would make this a duplicate question so why would you answer it and not vote to close it as exact duplicate – mcgrailm May 27 '11 at 13:26
3  
@mcgrailm Hmm... Well, it seemed to come at the topic from a slightly different angle, and touch on development process (before submission). I think the OP's development process may be hampering his ability to easily step through the hurdles of submission for a client. But I could be wrong. :-) I also think that providing an answer is more useful than chastising for not searching... :-) – Mark Granoff May 27 '11 at 13:30
    
if I had answer I would post it on the duplicate you found vote to close as duplicate and put a comment to with like to your answer on duplicate – mcgrailm May 27 '11 at 13:32
    
In my case I can not use a wildcard app id because I am using push notifications. So I guess I still have to use a different app id for the client which is kind of unhandy. – Monkey King May 27 '11 at 13:38
    
Interesting. I would have thought that com.YouCo.appid would be unique from com.ClientCo.appid... – Mark Granoff May 27 '11 at 13:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.