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I was coding away today when I came across something I do all the time without thinking as wondered if it had any after affects.

Here are two ways of doing the same thing

if(foo != true)
{
bar ++;
}

if(foo == true)
{
}
else
{
bar ++;
}

Now I know the compiler would probably optimise this to the same thing but I want to know the difference because you cannot always count on them.

My question is really would the second option incur some kind of penalty because it adds another command to the check ?

Yes it was a typo.

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7  
There's a bug in the second example, you meamt if (foo == true). Actually, you should just just use if (foo) and if (!foo). –  delnan May 27 '11 at 13:20
3  
Micro-optimisation = fail. Most times, never ever think about micro-optimisation unless profiling proves it's needed. –  Chris Jester-Young May 27 '11 at 13:20
2  
@Chris I disagree. If, all other things being equal, one variant always performs better then there’s good incentive to know this and always use this variant. Compare x++ vs. ++x. –  Konrad Rudolph May 27 '11 at 13:23
1  
@Konrad: Some micro-optimizations are worth knowing if they apply. For 90% of the code most of us write, they don't. And if you're writing software that's performance critical, you still get much more performance improvements by larger-scale optimizations instead of trying to "optimize" every single line. Yeah, sometimes you have to micro-optimize the living daylight out of something. But that's the exception and hence it shouldn't be promoted in any way. If some code is really too slow, optimize it. Otherwise, don't even worry. –  delnan May 27 '11 at 13:35
1  
@Konrad: FWIW, I wrote a book about all this because I felt so strongly about it. It's long out of print (and going for a ridiculous price on Amazon), but I'm trying to see if I can get it up on Google. The basic idea is don't look at software as algorithms & data structures. Look at them in information-theoretic terms (Shannon & Kolmogorov). Algorithm = channel. Data = storage of info between acquisition & need. Source text = encoding the problem. Then you have more freedom of representation. –  Mike Dunlavey May 29 '11 at 16:30

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Neither is good. Apart from the fact that the second contains a typo (= instead of ==), comparing booleans to constants is just redundant. Just test their values directly:

if (! foo) …
// Instead of
if (foo != true) …

// or

if (foo) …
// Instead of
if (foo == true) …

First of all, it removes the possibility of creating bugs though typos (as you have graciously shown). But apart from that it’s just more logical.

(Note however that it’s not more efficient. The statements are strictly equivalent.)

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I disagree. Unless the first branch is effectively empty, and some branch prediction is going on, generated code is going to differ. I'm editing my answer for more details, if you're interested. –  King_DuckZ May 27 '11 at 14:06
    
@King Yes; that was the OP’s point though (as far as I understand it): the first branch is empty. That said, regardless of branches my answer still counts. There is never a reason to equality compare to a boolean constant explicitly. –  Konrad Rudolph May 27 '11 at 14:22

Those have the same effect and the same machine code will likely be emitted by any decent compiler - checking a boolean and selecting what to do will be done the fastest way possible. "Adding else" is not how it works inside - that's just the if-else statement that must have certain effect, it's up to the compiler how to achieve that effect. Just adding a keyword doesn't necessarily cause extra code emission.

If you really care you should inspect the emitted machine code and see what the compiler emits in each case.

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I assume you did a typo in writing = instead of ==. Those blocks are not equivalent: modern CPUs try to pre-fetch and pre-execute assembly instructions as a program runs, and when a conditional jump is met, the CPU pre-runs the code it would execute if the condition is true.

So I usually put code that is likely to be executed more often on top, although branch prediction and other optimizations the compiler does might change this and do a much better job.

Edit: Please have a look at Branch prediction on Wikipedia, and especially to the Static prediction section. Unless you're sure 100% of what optimizations the compiler will do and what CPU will run your code, you're best bet is to assume that the first block is run faster. In the worst case, you get no benefit and no loss. In the best case, you're making code that is easier to read and runs faster.

Counter-example:

if (someCondition)
    AssertNotReached();
else
    DoRealWork();
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If the code is run anywhere near enough to be important from a performance point of view on a modern x86 CPU (can't speak for ARM but I'd wager too) and there's a noticeable statistical deviation in which branch is taken, the branch predictor will worry about it. So I wouldn't waste even a second thinking about this - I think it's fair to say that this is pretty much THE prime example of a micro optimization. –  Voo May 27 '11 at 16:39
    
The poster asked if there is a difference, and what I'm trying to say is that it depends on the underlying architecture and the compiler. If that difference is relevant to Skeith is beyond the purpose of my answer. I do agree however that unless you meet a no brainer case like the one I pointed out (which has the side effect to be more readable as well), putting effort in reordering branches is a loss of time. –  King_DuckZ May 27 '11 at 16:53
    
Sorry I thought you actually championed putting the most often executed branch at top. I agree with your counter example - in that case the readability is quite improved which is always worth a second or two :) –  Voo May 28 '11 at 16:25

Both are not same, in your second code always the if statement gets executed as its given as foo = true.

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There is a big difference, the first inc's bar base on a condition, the second sets foo to true.

if(foo != true)
{
bar ++;
}

if(foo = true) //this sets foo to true and takes the true branch of the statement, any optmizing compiler will remove the else section
{
}
else
{
bar ++;
}

Assuming that the above was a typo, they are the same at machine level, but they are different in terms of parse time and time it takes to write out.

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It depends on the compiler. In the worse case, it adds a couple extra jump instructions.

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Semantically this is the same. What happens beyond this depends on the compiler. Usually, with an if statement, the compiler will assume that the "if" branch is taken more likely and optimize for this. If this happens, the second example would indeed have some performance penalty. But it really depends on many thing we don't know from the context of the question.

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