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Provide one line PowerShell script that you found useful, one script per answer please.

There is a similar question here, but this one gives only links to pages with scripts, lets answers one by one here and have a contributed list of most frequently used or most useful scripts.

  1. List most recent version of files

    ls -r -fi *.lis | sort @{expression={$_.Name}}, @{expression={$_.LastWriteTime};Descending=$true} | select Directory, Name, lastwritetime | Group-Object Name | %{$_.Group | Select -first 1}

  2. gps programThatIsAnnoyingMe | kill

  3. Open a file with its registered program (like start e.g start foo.xls)

    ii foo.xls

  4. Retrieves and displays the paths to the system's Special Folder's

    [enum]::getvalues([system.environment+specialfolder]) | foreach {"$_ maps to " + [system.Environment]::GetFolderPath($_)}

  5. Copy Environment value to clipboard (so now u know how to use clipboard!)

    $env:appdata | % { [windows.forms.clipboard]::SetText($input) }
    OR
    ls | clip

With SnapIns

  1. Files between two changeset numbers in TFS

    Get-TfsItemHistory <location> -Recurse -Version <label1>~<label2> | % { $(Get-TfsChangeset $_.ChangeSetID).Changes } | % { $_.Item.ServerItem } | Sort-Object -Unique

  2. Gets queue messages with errors over all Hub servers in exchange 200

    Get-ExchangeServer | ?{$_.IsHubTransportServer -eq $true} | Get-Queue | ?{$_.LastError -ne $null} | Sort-Object -Descending -Property MessageCount | ft -Property NextHopDomain,@{l="Count";e={$_.MessageCount}},@{l="Last Try";e={$_.LastRetryTime.tosting("M/dd hh:mm")}},@{l="Retry";e={$_.NextRetryTime.tostring("M/dd hh:mm")}},Status,LastError -AutoSize

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Polls should be Community WIKIs –  JaredPar Mar 5 '09 at 15:36
1  
And typically don't belong on SO anyway. –  EBGreen Mar 5 '09 at 15:41
1  
@EBGreen: often no, they don't. I think this one is pretty good, though (if we clear up the wording some). It can server as a good PS introduction. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 5 '09 at 15:47
2  
Yuck. Not a question. Stuff like this should go on wiki.poshcode.org or something –  Jaykul Jun 1 '09 at 16:35
3  
Just because you put A LOT of crap on one line does not really make it a one-liner. –  Seb Nilsson Dec 18 '09 at 13:12
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17 Answers

At about 6:00 PM....

exit
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ha ha ha ha ha! –  Binoj Antony Jun 3 '09 at 15:38
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Well, here is one I use often along with some explanation.

ii .

The ii is an alias for Invoke-Item. This commandlet essentially invokes whatever command is registered in windows for the following item. So this:

ii foo.xls

Would open foo.xls in Excel (assuming you have Excel installed and .xls files are associated to Excel).

In ii . the . refers to the current working directory, so the command would cause windows explorer to open at the current directory.

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3  
You can do that in a normal prompt, just type foo.xls and it will start Excel/OpenOffice/Whatever you have associated. Type Explorer and it will start a windows explorer session at that location. –  Christian Witts Mar 5 '09 at 17:00
    
I usually do this using start ., start myFile.xls, or start "" "My File.xls". How is Invoke-Item superior to the normal start command? –  Hosam Aly Mar 5 '09 at 17:14
    
@Hosam, you use start myfile.xls in powershell? –  EBGreen Mar 5 '09 at 17:53
    
@Christian, to be pedantically correct, typing foo.xls will not work, you would have to type .\foo.xls. Also, you are correct that typing Explorer will work, but that is 8 characters compared to the 4 characters of ii . –  EBGreen Mar 5 '09 at 17:56
    
Nice! I had created a script that would do the same through the Shell.Application object, but that's a lot simpler! –  zdan Mar 5 '09 at 20:16
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List all the files that I've updated today:

dir | ?{$_.LastWriteTime -ge [DateTime]::Today}

Use it so often that I've actually created a little function in my profile:

function Where-UpdatedSince{
Param([DateTime]$date = [DateTime]::Today,
      [switch]$before=$False)
Process
{ 
    if (($_.LastWriteTime -ge $date) -xor $before)
    {
        Write-Output $_
    }
} 
};  set-item -path alias:wus -value Where-UpdatedSince

So I can say:

dir | wus
dir | wus "1/1/2009"

To see stuff updated before today:

dir | wus -before
share|improve this answer
    
It makes better sense to declare Where-UpdatedSince as a function. Also -before parameter could be [switch]. –  stej Apr 4 '10 at 22:22
    
@stej - Where-UpdatedSince is a function. I've update the -before parameter to a switch. That wasn't around in PS v1 when I originally wrote this. –  zdan Apr 5 '10 at 20:05
    
I ment 'filter', not 'function' :) I just added comment to keep it up to date - for anybody comming along and reading your post. –  stej Apr 6 '10 at 6:30
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My favorite powershell one liner

gps programThatIsAnnoyingMe | kill
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($x=new-object xml).Load("http://rss.slashdot.org/Slashdot/slashdot");$x.RDF.item|?{$_.creator-ne"kdawson"}|fl descr*

My favorite: It's a slashdot reader sans the horrible submissions by mr. kdawson. It's designed to be fewer than 120 chars which allows it to be used as signature on /.

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Suppress Visual Studio 2012 ALL CAPS Menus - The very first thing I do after installing VS2012.

Set-ItemProperty -Path HKCU:\Software\Microsoft\VisualStudio\11.0\General -Name SuppressUppercaseConversion -Type DWord -Value 1

Thanks to Richard Banks who discovered the registry value.

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Retrieves and displays the paths to the system's Special Folder's

[enum]::getvalues([system.environment+specialfolder]) | foreach {"$_ maps to " + [system.Environment]::GetFolderPath($_)}
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This shows which processes are using which versions of the MS CRT DLLs:

gps | select ProcessName -exp Modules -ea 0 | 
  where {$_.modulename -match 'msvc'} | sort ModuleName | 
  Format-Table ProcessName -GroupBy ModuleName
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It may be cheating since I have the TFS PowerTools snap installed but this is quite useful for finding out which files have changed between two changesets, versions, or labels.

Get-TfsItemHistory <location> -Recurse -Version <label1>~<label2> | 
% { $(Get-TfsChangeset $_.ChangeSetID).Changes } |
% { $_.Item.ServerItem } | Sort-Object -Unique
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I don't like complicated applications for counting lines of code, especially because I consider it to be a bogus metric in the first place. I end up using a PS one-liner instead:

PS C:\Path> (dir -include *.cs,*.xaml -recurse | select-string .).Count

I just include the extensions of the files I want to include in the line count and go for it from the project's root directory.

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I usually do (gci -r -inc *.cs,*.xaml|gc)-ne''|measure –  Јοеу Jun 15 '12 at 18:15
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I found it useful to show values of environment variables

dir env:

And you can copy an env value as well to the clipboard

$env:appdata | % { [windows.forms.clipboard]::SetText($input) }

(you need to have windows.forms loaded before the call: Add-Type –a system.windows.forms; and run PowerShell with -STA switch)

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Gets queue messages with errors over all Hub servers in exchange 2007 (with some formatting)

Get-ExchangeServer | ?{$_.IsHubTransportServer -eq $true} | Get-Queue | ?{$_.LastError -ne $null} | Sort-Object -Descending -Property MessageCount | ft -Property NextHopDomain,@{l="Count";e={$_.MessageCount}},@{l="Last Try";e={$_.LastRetryTime.tosting("M/dd hh:mm")}},@{l="Retry";e={$_.NextRetryTime.tostring("M/dd hh:mm")}},Status,LastError -AutoSize
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pipe the output of something to the clipboard

ls | clip
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Function display's System Uptime I use this for my accounting spreadsheet

    function get-uptime
{
$PCounter = "System.Diagnostics.PerformanceCounter"
$counter = new-object $PCounter System,"System Up Time"
$value = $counter.NextValue()
$uptime = [System.TimeSpan]::FromSeconds($counter.NextValue())
"Uptime: $uptime"
"System Boot: " + ((get-date) - $uptime)
}
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1  
In V2 there is easier way how to read performance counters: Get-Counter System,"System Up Time". –  stej Apr 4 '10 at 22:31
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Copy some to the desktop:

Copy-Item $home\*.txt ([Environment]::GetFolderPath("Desktop"))
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List all Windows Providers in alpha order:

get-winevent -listprovider microsoft-windows* | % {$_.Name} | sort

Actually you can use this with a wildcard for any specific group of Providers:

get-winevent -listprovider microsoft-windows-Securit* | % {$_.Name} | sort
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Generate some pseudo random bytes in a file.

[Byte[]]$out=@(); 0..9 | %{$out += Get-Random -Minimum 0 -Maximum 255}; [System.IO.File]::WriteAllBytes("random",$out)

The Get-Random algorithm takes a seed from the system clock, so don't use this for serious cryptographic needs.

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