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I have a query


SELECT COUNT(*) AS "CNT",
       imei
FROM   devices  

which executes just fine. I want to further restrict the query with a WHERE statement. The (humanly) logical next step is to modify the query followingly:


SELECT COUNT(*) AS "CNT",
       imei
FROM   devices
WHERE  CNT > 1 

However, this results in a error message ORA-00904: "CNT": invalid identifier. For some reason, wrapping the query in another query produces the desired result:


SELECT *
FROM   (SELECT COUNT(*) AS "CNT",
               imei
        FROM   devices
        GROUP  BY imei)
WHERE  CNT > 1  

Why does Oracle not recognize the alias "CNT" in the second query?

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1  
As a sidenote: this query (with aggregates) is better written with the HAVING clause: "select count(*) cnt, imei from devices group by imei having count(*) > 1" –  Rob van Wijk May 27 '11 at 15:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The simple answer is that the AS clause defines what the column will be called in the result, which is a different scope than the query itself.

In your example, using the HAVING clause would work best:

SELECT COUNT(*) AS "CNT",
       imei
FROM   devices
GROUP  BY imei
HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
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In the OP's question, it's not just that HAVING would work best, it's that HAVING is the answer. You can't apply a where clause to an aggregate like count(*), which is why the HAVING clause exists. Also, as per standard SQL order of processing, WHERE happens before the SELECT, so the alias CNT doesn't even exist at the point in time when the WHERE clause is applied. From, Where, Group By, Having, Select Order By bennadel.com/blog/70-sql-query-order-of-operations.htm –  Davos Jun 24 at 4:32

Because the documentation says it won't:

Specify an alias for the column expression. Oracle Database will use this alias in the column heading of the result set. The AS keyword is optional. The alias effectively renames the select list item for the duration of the query. The alias can be used in the order_by_clause but not other clauses in the query.

However, when you have an inner select, that is like creating an inline view where the column aliases take effect, so you are able to use that in the outer level.

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I would imagine because the alias is not assigned to the result column until after the WHERE clause has been processed and the data generated. Is Oracle different from other DBMSs in this behaviour?

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To summarize, this little gem explains:

10 Easy Steps to a Complete Understanding of SQL

A common source of confusion is the simple fact that SQL syntax elements are not ordered in the way they are executed. The lexical ordering is:

SELECT [ DISTINCT ]
FROM
WHERE
GROUP BY
HAVING
UNION
ORDER BY

For simplicity, not all SQL clauses are listed. This lexical ordering differs fundamentally from the logical order, i.e. from the order of execution:

FROM
WHERE
GROUP BY
HAVING
SELECT
DISTINCT
UNION
ORDER BY

As a consequence, anything that you label using "AS" will only be available once the WHERE, HAVING and GROUP BY have already been performed.

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