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1) In the following method (actionListener) a user select a grade (e.g. A-F) from a JComboBox.

2) There are multiple JComboBoxes, and each selection made gets stored into a single String[] array.

PROBLEM: Here is the dilemma, if a user goes back and changes a selection made from a random JComboBox the previous grade selection does not get replaced in the array, however the new selection made gets stored at the next array index.

How can I make the program replace the previous grade selection and not just add the new selection?

relevant variables:

int counter;
private JComboBox[] gradeField;
//grade.userGrades[] is array of grades taken from selected combo boxes                  

Action Listener anonymous class:

gradeField[counter].addActionListener(new ActionListener () {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                Object holder = e.getSource();
                JComboBox tempGradeBox = (JComboBox)holder;
                String theGrade = (String)tempGradeBox.getSelectedItem();
                grade.userGrades[grade.getNext()] = theGrade;
                grade.updateNext();
            }                       
        });

Thanks in advance for any help.

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Your question is not clear enough for me, could you please explain more? –  MByD May 27 '11 at 16:10
    
Sorry for any vagueness, Once someone selects a grade from the comboBox I save the grade in an array and increment the index, but if I change the grade on the combo box i get an out of bound error because of the getNext method. I dont want to add the new grade if the user has already selected something from that combo box, I want to replace what the grade. –  RandellK02 May 27 '11 at 16:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Update the user grade being at the same index as the combo box:

    final int index = counter;
    gradeField[counter].addActionListener(new ActionListener () {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            Object holder = e.getSource();
            JComboBox tempGradeBox = (JComboBox)holder;
            String theGrade = (String)tempGradeBox.getSelectedItem();
            grade.userGrades[index] = theGrade;
        }                       
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for tip! Helped me out tremendously :) –  RandellK02 May 27 '11 at 19:23

I save the grade in an array and increment the index,

Well you should not be incrementing the index. This assumes that the user selects the grades from the combo box in a sequential order. As you have discovered users can often work randomly.

Instead you need to know which combo box has been changed and then update the appropriate entry in your array.

Or a different solution might be to update your array at the end. So maybe you have a "Process Results" button. Then you can sequentually loop through all the combo boxes to get the selected value.

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Thanks for your help. I will use your way of thinking next time. –  RandellK02 May 27 '11 at 19:24

Here's another variation of JB Nizet's answer:

class OuterClass
{
 ...

 gradeField[counter].addActionListener( new GradeSettingActionListener( counter ) );

 ...
 class GradeSettingActionListener implements ActionListener
 {
  // -- Doesn't have to be final here (it does in JB's answer), but I like to be restrictive.
  private final int index;

  public GradeSettingActionListener( int index )
  {
   this.index = index;
  }

  @Override
  public void actionPerformed( ActionEvent e )
  {
   Object holder = e.getSource();
   JComboBox tempGradeBox = (JComboBox) holder;
   String theGrade = (String) tempGradeBox.getSelectedItem();
   grade.userGrades[index] = theGrade;
  }
 }
}

This approach removes the anonymous class by adding an inner class. The inner class will still have access to grade. You don't gain much here unless there's a chance you'll be splitting out the inner class later.

Of course, camickr's suggestion to process all the grades at once may also be valid, depending on other requirements (i.e., whether additional processing is done after the grades are stored in the array, which seems likely).

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Thanks for your help. This is good information because sometimes I dont like to use anonymous classes if I can make more sense with an inner class. –  RandellK02 May 27 '11 at 19:27

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