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Which one's a better way of doing list comprehension in python (in terms of computation time & cpu cycles). In example (1) is the value f(r) evaluated in each iteration or is it evaluated once and cached ?

  1. y = [x*f(r) for x in xlist]

  2. c = f(r)

    y = [x*c for x in xlist]

where

def f(r):
    ... some arbitrary function ...
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2  
"Is the choice dependent on how complicated f(r) evaluation is ?" How do you define "complicated" here? And, more importantly, when and how does Python do this determination of "complexity". And, even more importantly, when the f(r) involves eval(), how can anything be determined? –  S.Lott May 27 '11 at 16:37
    
Sorry for not being clear, I meant should 'I', as the user choose between (1) & (2) depending on function complexity or should I always choose (2). –  ensnap May 27 '11 at 17:27
    
@ensnap: What? "Is the value f(r) evaluated once and cached ?" In the 2nd example, yes. In the first example, no. And Python (given the existence of eval(), cannot optimize this for you. What are you asking? Please update the question to be more clear. –  S.Lott May 27 '11 at 17:39
    
@ensnap: "should 'I', as the user choose" and "is the function evaluated multiple times" are completely different. Please fix the title or the question to match each other better. It's very confusing. –  S.Lott May 27 '11 at 19:29
    
@S.Lott The title asks "is the function evaluated multiple times in a list comprehension". The answer from the response is yes. So (2) is a better approach. –  ensnap May 27 '11 at 19:57

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I would probably choose the latter because the Python compiler doesn't know if the function has side-effects so it is called for each element.

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+1 for mentioning side-effects –  David Heffernan May 27 '11 at 16:20
    
"probably"? Considering that the function could use eval(), what other choice can there possibly be? –  S.Lott May 27 '11 at 17:11
    
I said probably because I hadn't written any code to confirm my theory. –  Asgeir May 27 '11 at 17:13
    
How can Python possibly "know if the function has side-effects"? The function could use eval() or exec and do anything. Since eval() exists, the function must be evaluated every single time or the semantics are horribly broken. –  S.Lott May 27 '11 at 17:40
    
@S Lott Why does the presence of eval guarantee that Python interpreter can't ever be sure that there's no side effects? –  max Nov 17 '11 at 19:38

It evaluates for every iteration. Look at this:

>>> def f():
...     print("func")
... 
>>> [f() for i in range(4)]
func
func
func
func
[None, None, None, None]

As you say, if f() has no side effects, storing the return value on a variable and using that variable instead is a lot faster solution.

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Here is an easy way to find out:

>>> def f():
...     print "called"
...     return 1
...
>>> [1+f() for x in xrange(5)]
called
called
called
called
called
[2, 2, 2, 2, 2]

so yes, if the function is going to be the same each time then it is better to call it once outside the list comprehension.

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The function f will be called for every element.

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It is very complex for the compiler/interpreter to determine that the function need not to be called many times. It is then very probable that the function is called many times. Thus, using the second solution is always the best solution.

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Functions have a non-trivial execution time compared to a name lookup, and caching the value is considered acceptable if the function is called many times and the same value is expected each time.

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Python is probably free to do it once or many times, I'm not sure I would rely on any observed behavior. It might change in the next version.

If it's important to you to make sure the function is only called once, call it yourself and save the results.

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2  
How would it be free to do it only once? Unless the interpreter can guarantee that f is side-effect free, it must call it every iteration no? –  Davy8 May 27 '11 at 16:31
    
@Davy8, certainly there are ways to guarantee that a function does not have side effects. If Python does not implement any today, it is still free to do so in the future. –  Mark Ransom May 27 '11 at 16:36
    
If the function uses eval() nothing can be determined. Therefore there's no alternative by evaluation of the function each time through the loop. Yes, a future version could break the semantics, but the idea of eval() is too fundamental to break. –  S.Lott May 27 '11 at 17:13
    
@S.Lott: then part of the determination would be "does this function call eval? You couldn't accurately classify every function, but it would certainly be possible to identify some simple functions that had no side effects - at least when called with built-in types. –  Thomas K May 27 '11 at 18:37
1  
@S.Lott: I didn't think it was doing anything this complex. But in principle, it's perfectly possible that it could, so the question isn't as stupid as you make out. –  Thomas K May 28 '11 at 20:38

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