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I have a class defined in the file board.H:

class Board
{
private:
    ...

public:
    ...
};

and in another class, I want to have a member that is a pointer to a Board object:

#include "board.H"

class Bear
{
private:
    Board* board;
    ...
public:
    ...
};

When I try to compile it (using g++ in linux) I get the following error:

bear.H:15: error: ISO C++ forbids declaration of `Board' with no type
bear.H:15: error: expected `;' before '*' token

What am I doing wrong?

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Is your Board class definition inside a namespace? –  Stormenet May 27 '11 at 16:22
    
How are you invoking GCC? –  Oli Charlesworth May 27 '11 at 16:23
3  
I suspect the error lies in the part of the code you have clipped. –  Mark Ransom May 27 '11 at 16:24
    
How are you compiling this? I see no problem with your code. –  juanchopanza May 27 '11 at 16:24
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Common problem. You probably have a #include "bear.H" line in your "board.H" file or in a file included by "board.H".

So when you include "bear.H" into "board.H", the "bear.H" file is processed and tries to include "board.H", but that file is already being processed so the header guard of "bear.H" won't include the content another time. But then "bear.H" is processed without a leading "Board" class definition.

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you are right, this is the case I have, how do I fix it? –  Ilya Melamed May 27 '11 at 16:27
2  
@Iiya Melamed I recommend that you make a new question for that. But as a hint - try to not depend on the definition of class Bear in "board.H". For example a "Bear*" doesn't need the definition of class "Bear", but only a forward declaration like "class Bear;". Then you don't need to include the "bear.H" header. Same goes for "void f(Bear b);" (but not "void f(Bear b) { }") and "Bear&". –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 27 '11 at 16:28
    
Compiler directives. By wrapping your classes with the #ifndef, #define, #endif directives found at the following address, the compiler should only try to compile each class once: cprogramming.com/reference/preprocessor/ifndef.html –  Mike Webb May 27 '11 at 16:31
    
I love how circular dependency error messages like this are so ambiguous. –  Anthony May 27 '11 at 17:24
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Check the namespace. If Board is in a different namespace than Bear, you need to add in Bear.h:

using <namespace>:: Board;
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